Monthly Archives: October 2017

Video of the Week #121: Master Calligrapher

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Video of the Week #121: Master Calligrapher

Tuesday Photo Challenge: Sky

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Tuesday Photo Challenge: Sky

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Over the canal.

Wordless Wednesday: Ruellia and Weeds

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Wordless Wednesday: Ruellia and Weeds

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Doing double duty with Cee’s Flower of the Day today.

Inktober Day 24: A Composite

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Inktober Day 24: A Composite

My Inktober drawing for Day 24 is a composite of three prompts: DC338 white on black, InktoberZAA xyp (the lace ribbons), and Inktober Tangles florz (the mesh between the ribbons).

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The Harp Twins

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It’s difficult to find information about the duo known as The Harp Twins without hiring a private detective. For example, no online source reveals their birthday or their age. The most complete biography I found is the one that appears on their website.

Camille and Kennerly Kitt have acted in movies and commercials. They’re both third-degree black belts in tae kwon do.

Both graduated summa cum laude from the Conservatory of Music at Wheaton College with Bachelor of Music degrees in harp performance. Though classically trained, they are better known for their many YouTube covers of rock songs and soundtracks. They’ve also recorded four albums.

They play movie themes while wearing related costumes:

And they’ve also done video game themes:

No one knows how hard it is to go on tour with harps:

I can’t look away. Does that mean I’m addicted to Harp Twins videos?

Monday Morning Wisdom #125

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Monday Morning Wisdom #125

“Ideas are like fish. You don’t make the fish. You catch the fish.” —David LynchMMW

Inktober Day 22: Yincut

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Inktober Day 22: Yincut

Using the InktoberTangles prompt:IMG_0198

From the Creator’s Heart #121

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From the Creator’s Heart #121

Naked I came from my mother’s womb, and naked I will depart. The Lord gave and the Lord has taken away; may the name of the Lord be praised (Job 1:21 NIV).

Weekend Writing Warriors #77: The Taste of Toasted Marshmallows, Revisited

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Weekend Writing Warriors #77: The Taste of Toasted Marshmallows, Revisited

Every Sunday, the Weekend Writing Warriors and Snippet Sunday participants share 8-10-sentence snippets from their works-in-progress on their blogs for others to read and comment on. Join the fun! Click on the links to see the full lists.

Today I’m reposting one of my OctPoWriMo poems. I wrote this in response to Day 3’s prompt: the taste of metal, which made me think of shish-kebobs, which of course made me think of toasting marshmallows. The form is cheritahanna-morris-278272

The part of the barbecue I like the best.

I select a skinny branch on the tree and snap it off.
I peel off the bark, and I sharpen one end of my stick to a point, rubbing it against the concrete back porch steps.

I stick a marshmallow on my homemade skewer, and hold it over the smoldering coals.
There is an art to this: too close, and it burns; too far away, and it takes forever.
Just right, and the sugary white blob turns brown, like deep suntan, the innards sweet melty goo.

Any suggestions on how I can make this poem better? Please comment below.

I may drop off Weekend Writing Warriors for a while. All my stories are in the midst of rewriting. The stories you haven’t seen yet are too raw for human eyes right now; they need to stew awhile.

Tempe Library Complex

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My husband and I have lived in Tempe, Arizona for 29 years. It’s a great place to live. When we moved here with our then four children (fifth child born nine months later), we were delighted to discover the plethora of community services for young families.

This building was the library when we first arrived in Tempe:

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But soon, ground was broken for a new library. I remember, when the staff was preparing to make the transition from the old building to the new, the community was invited to take out as many books as possible, and return them to the new library when it opened. My kids and I were happy to oblige.

Eventually, the old library was reopened as the Tempe History Museum. When my daughter Erin attended Smith College, she served as a summer intern at the museum.

Here’s what the current library looks like:

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Yes, it’s huge. Its vast collection is housed on the first floor, with the children’s section located in the basement. There are meeting rooms, study rooms, public computers, and a few years ago they added a coffee shop. Since I have stacks of books at home that I haven’t read yet, I haven’t borrowed any books in years, but my son Matt visits frequently to browse through the movies. The day I took these pictures, I dropped in to check out the Friends of the Library used bookstore. I bought two books for a total of 75 cents. Sigh. I told you I’m a bookaholic.

The second story contains city recreation offices.

In a little plaza formed by a circular drive to the library entrance stands a public art sculpture. The inclined plane is supposed to be a map of Tempe. I can see the dry (as it was when the sculpture was created, before the construction of Tempe Town Lake) Salt River bed stretching across the top, and I surmise the stacked structure is the butte that encloses Arizona State University’s stadium. That must be the rest of the campus surrounding it. But after that, it all gets kind of abstract. I feel like I should be able to find my neighborhood on that gridwork of major roads, but I can’t find any other landmarks where I think they should be.

The sculpture took the place of a prickly pear cactus garden that used to be there. I liked that better.

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Here’s a stone wall along a walkway, with an interesting edge (click on the smaller images to enlarge):

And the Edna Vihel Center, where I took my children to many events and classes over the years:

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I hadn’t been here in a while, and I’d never seen this lovely bench, covered with hand-made tiles depicting feet and scenes and symbols relating to Tempe and city services:

Tempe is very energy conscious. The city government advocates in favor of bike lanes. The library complex has some covered parking, shaded by solar panels:

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There’s one more building in the library complex that I didn’t photograph, because it was hot and I was too lazy to walk across the parking lot: the Pyle Adult Recreation Center. Among other events and classes available there, it also hosts activities for senior citizens. I haven’t taken advantage of them yet, but I probably will someday soon.

My little photo essay ends with shots of some of the landscaping at the library complex.