Serb Fest

Standard
Serb Fest

A couple weeks ago, my daughter Katie accompanied me to the Serbian Festival in Phoenix to celebrate my birthday.

Serbia is located in southeastern Europe on the Balkan peninsula, east of Italy across the Adriatic Sea. In 1918, Serbia, along with Bosnia, Herzegovina, Croatia, Montenegro, Macedonia, Kosovo, Vojvodina, and Slovenia, merged to become Yugoslavia. They disbanded into independent nations in 1991 (I am greatly over-simplifying their struggles).

The festival took place at the beautiful (and colorful) St. Sava Serbian Orthodox Church, which was open to the public. We went on the second day of the two-day festival.

 

 

One of the missions of the church, besides worshipping God in the traditional manner of Serbian Christians, is to preserve and pass on the culture and heritage of Serbia. The church also sponsors folklore groups for children and teens to teach and keep alive the traditions, music, and dances of Serbia.

The foyer to their Cultural Center was open as well, featuring educational exhibits, including these authentic Serbian costumes.

IMG_1206

When we arrived, Srbija, a three-piece band (keyboard, accordion, and drum set) was playing Serbian music. I recognized some of the songs and joined the line of dancers doing the lesnoto step.

IMG_1202

No ethnic festival would be complete without food, and this one was no exception. Katie and I split a palacinke (Serbian crepe) filled with nutella and ground walnuts.

The band played some more Serbians songs, and a bunch of teenaged girls (and an older woman) got up to dance.

IMG_1221

But for me, the main event was the church’s Serbian folk dance groups. First up were the little kids:

IMG_1225

IMG_1232

Next were the Juniors:

IMG_1240

img_1247.jpg

And finally the Seniors:

IMG_1257

 

IMG_1255

Don’t you love the shoes with the up-turned tips?

IMG_1254

Below, the girls dance in a circle while the boys grab onto the girls’ belts.

IMG_1261

And here, the boys and girls are arranged like spokes on a wheel…

IMG_1267

IMG_1273

IMG_1283

IMG_1291

IMG_1292

IMG_1295

IMG_1299

In the photos below, the dancers are linked together by holding on to each other’s belts:

IMG_1328

IMG_1330

As the program went on, the dances grew more and more complex. The girls always smiled. They were so beautiful, and the boys, so handsome. Aren’t their costumes gorgeous? Many of them were made by hand by their mothers, including the embroidery.

 

3 responses »

    • It’s fun! You learn about other cultures, hear people talk in different languages, and get to taste foods you might never try otherwise.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s