Monthly Archives: March 2019

Monday Morning Wisdom #199

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cormier quote

From the Creator’s Heart #195

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Image 10-12-18 at 11.14 AM

Creative Juice #132

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Creative Juice #132

Twelve inspiring articles:

In the Meme Time: Inexhaustible

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Inexhaustbile

Guest Post: 8 Poetry Elements That Editors Love To Publish by Writer’s Relief

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This article has been reprinted with the permission of Writer’s Relief, a highly recommended author’s submission service. We assist writers with preparing their submissions and researching the best markets. We have a service for every budget, as well as a free e-publication for writers, Submit Write Now! Visit our site today to learn more.

As you read this, editors are eagerly searching for poetry submissions to publish in their literary journals. And at the same time, writers are preparing their strongest poems to submit! So if you want your poems to stand out — and to increase your odds of getting published in a literary magazine — consider the core poetry elements that lit mag editors find irresistible when reading poetry submissions.

Poetry Elements Editors Love To See In Poem Submissions

New perspectives on traditional topics. In the right hands, old subject matter can become startlingly new. Feel free to explore any subject you like — don’t worry about it being overly “familiar.” Just be sure to add your own unique perspective and voice, and your poem will naturally bring something fresh to an ongoing conversation.

Boldness and bravery. Whether a poem explores a moment of unspeakable sacrifice or quiet shock, the spirit of a poem can catch an editor’s eye. Editors love to be engaged (and sometimes surprised) by an emotionally generous poem.

Experimentation. Editors enjoy finding poems that bend the rules, challenge readers’ assumptions, and bring a new sensibility to traditional forms. Discovering new ways of using language and trying new forms are great ways to stand out in a crowd.

Playfulness and humor. Some poets fall into the trap of writing poems that strike only one note or explore only one mood. But sometimes, a little bit of whimsy, humor, self-awareness, and playfulness can bring much-needed levity to an otherwise heavy poem.

Brevity. A few editors accept long poems, but poems that fit on one page are easier to place with today’s editors than longer poems. There are a number of reasons for this. Short poems are easier to lay out on a page; they allow for editors to feature more writers in one issue; and — frankly — they tend to be rigorously precise and concise.

Print-friendly formats. Poems that feature such long lines that they can’t fit the width of a single page tend to be challenging for editors. The same goes for poems that incorporate multimedia elements or that require unusual formatting. Even when editors love such poems, some literary magazines simply don’t have the technology to publish them.

Multiculturalism. Poems that explore various cultures — whether the culture of a specific socioeconomic region or of a single family — tend to claim a special place in literary magazines and journals. The key is writing about multicultural perspectives with authentic insight and sensitivity.

Core human concerns. Poems that explore the questions, issues, and emotions we all have in common are poems that have the potential to reach a wide audience — and touch people’s hearts. Editors are often drawn to poems that delve deep into the fundamental aspects of the human experience.

What Editors Really Don’t Like These Days

In the right hands, poetry concepts that have fallen out of favor can be elevated to something marvelous. But if you’re wondering what kinds of things editors (as a whole) tend not to accept these days, here’s a short list: rhyming poetry, one-word titles like “death” or “promise,” super-long poems, double-spacing, centering, and more. But remember: It’s better to write what feels right than what is trendy.

Video of the Week: Happy Spring

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Wordless Wednesday: Birdie Birdie in the Tree

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Phoenix Folk Dance Festival

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Phoenix Folk Dance Festival

This past Saturday marked the 32nd Annual Phoenix Folk Dance Festival.  You missed it? Tsk. Too bad. Make sure you come next year. It will be announced on the ARHtistic License Facebook page (another reason to “like” it). Or better yet, follow the Phoenix International Folk Dancers Facebook page, too.

In the mean time, I’ll give you a small taste of what you missed.

 

I didn’t take my good camera; after sitting out last year because of my pending hip replacement, this year I planned to dance all afternoon (12 noon to 4:30), and I didn’t want to have to babysit my expensive camera. So the photographs I took aren’t all that good; the shutter speed on my Sony Cyber-shot is so slow it didn’t take the picture I’d framed, and it didn’t freeze the action, so they turned out all blurry.

 

We danced folk dances from many countries: Serbia, Bulgaria, South Africa, Albania, Kurdistan, Romania, Israel, Albania, Russia, Turkey, Colombia, United States, Ireland, Hungary, Poland, Greece, Bolivia, Macedonia, Scotland, Maldova, Armenia, Finland, and Japan were all represented, as were the Roma people.

Two exhibition groups performed. The Tucson International Folk Dancers danced Ukrainian dances.

The Asli Karatas Dancers were two youth groups. The youngest dancers performed Turkish dances:

And the older dancers demonstrated the Charleston and some Rockabilly moves:

And I captured the general participants doing an Israeli dance, Erev Ba.

The festival passed surprisingly quickly. We had guests from all over Arizona. We saw some old friends we haven’t seen in a while. We had a lot of fun, and we hope you will join us next year. Or if you’re ever in the Phoenix area, come dance with us most Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 9:30 at the Irish Cultural Center. Bring your dancing shoes.

Wayne Magninie took this panoramic video of most of the attendees. If you look very carefully, you might even find me!

 

Monday Morning Wisdom #198

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Happy St. Patty’s Day

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This is so sweet I just had to share! Thanks to Kathy Temean for collecting these gorgeous illustrations–and interviewing all these artists!

Writing and Illustrating

CAROLYN LE: Featured on Illustrator Saturday September 12, 2015

BARBARA DILORENZO: Featured on Illustrator Saturday April 14, 2012

DAVID THORN WENZEL: Featured on Illustrator Saturday August 24, 2013

ANGELA MATTESON: Featured on Illustrator Saturday December 10, 2011

NICOLE STEMLOW MONAHAN: https://www.monahanstudio.com/

SUSAN MILLER: Featured on Illustrator Saturday August 25, 2018

NATASHA WING: Author – http://natashawing.com/nightbefore/120715

NOEL Ill: Being featured this Spring on Illustrator Saturday – Please check back!

LENA RALSTON: Lena is being featured this month on Illustrator Saturday – Check Back!

CHRISTINA WALD: Featured on Illustrator Saturday March 16, 2019

AMALIA HOFFMAN: Featured on Illustrator Saturday September 18, 2010

 

KIMBERLY BETTI: https://www.kimberlybatti.com

CHRISTINA WALD: Featured on Illustrator Saturday March 16, 2019

NICOLE TADGELL: Featured on Illustrator Saturday April 2, 2011

May you live a long life,

full of gladness and health,

with a pocket full of gold,

as the least of your wealth.

May the dreams you hold…

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