I’d Rather Be Dancing Scottish Folk Dances

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I’d Rather Be Dancing Scottish Folk Dances

During this time of social distancing, our Phoenix International Folk Dancers have not been meeting. Our annual Folk Dance Festival, originally scheduled for March, was postponed indefinitely. I don’t know when our weekly dance venue will reopen.

But back when we were dancing, we did a few Scottish dances. One of our favorites is Domino 5.

Another Scottish dance in our repertoire is Road to the Isles. The handhold is all-important in this dance; it’s what makes the turn simple.

The rest of these dances are not familiar to me, but they are lovely.

1314 is a significant year in Scottish history; Robert the Bruce defeated the English invaders at the Battle of Bannockburn. The dance is characterized by a long, bouncing step, beautifully executed in this video.

St. Bernard’s Waltz has some graceful turns and a foot stamp feature:

Bonnie Anne reminds me of some of the Irish dances I’ve seen (think Riverdance) due to the erect stance, hands straight down, and pointed toes.

The Brittania Two-Step is done in formations of 3-person lines, going forward and backward, and the gent in the center turns his two partners under his arms.

In Catch the Wind, the head couple does most of the dancing.

In The Dashing White Sergeant, you get to change partners within your circle.

Eightsome Reel is a bit complicated. Dancers get a chance to improvise in the centers of their circles (macarena?). I see a recurring figure-eight pattern done by four dancers.

Some of the young people dancing this Military Two-Step kick very high; when senior citizens dance it, it’s slightly less athletic.

About Andrea R Huelsenbeck

Andrea R Huelsenbeck is a wife, a mother of five and a former elementary general music teacher. A freelance writer in the 1990s, her nonfiction articles and book reviews appeared in Raising Arizona Kids, Christian Library Journal, and other publications. She is currently working on a young adult mystical fantasy novel and a mystery.

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