Category Archives: Architecture

Creative Juice #130

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Creative Juice #130

Beautiful things to admire or make.

  1. Fish made out of junk.
  2. Winter in beautiful Romania.
  3. Oscars fashions from years back.
  4. Beautiful Zentangles.
  5. Quilt tutorial: Teresa Down Under teaches how to make Delectable Mountain blocks and how to arrange them to create different kinds of quilts.
  6. What matters most to an artist?
  7. Like donuts? Wonderful watercolor tutorial.
  8. Your cat needs a ladder.
  9. Mardi Gras, but different.
  10. El Alto’s architecture is over the top.
  11. Free quilt patterns to make for St. Patrick’s Day. (Well, maybe for next Patrick’s Day!)
  12. These beautiful wedding dresses and bridal head dresses almost make me want to get married all over again.

Creative Juice #127

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Creative Juice #127

Somehow I got out of sequence. This should have been last week’s collection. Somehow I misplaced it after I found the Grant Snider piece. . .

Creative Juice #128

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Creative Juice #128

May you be full of wonder this weekend.

Walking on Arizona State University Campus

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Walking on Arizona State University Campus

After I climbed “A” Mountain last week, I walked on to nearby ASU. I passed by Tempe City Hall, below. If it looks kind of wonky, it’s because, yes, it’s an inverted pyramid.

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Just north of ASU campus is the Islamic Community Center. See “A” Mountain in the background.

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Look at these lovely street lamps disguised as palm trees:

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I love college campuses. From the time I was a junior in high school and was visiting potential higher education institutions, I’ve felt a distinct energy on campuses, a huge intellectual potential; students and faculty members with so much to offer and explore. I still experience that buzz any time I set foot on college property.

Every college has its Old Main building with a quad out front, and Arizona State University is no exception.

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ASU was founded as a Normal School,  a training college for teachers.

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The University Club is a private club for current and retired faculty, staff, alumni, community and corporate members, who can gather there for weekday lunches and meetings or special events.

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This is the entrance to Hayden Library, which is actually housed underground.

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I have no idea what this tower structure with the steps is, but it provides seating for people to eat lunch or check their phone.DSC03353

ASU’s Herberger Institute School of Music, one of the finest music programs in the country, is housed in this “birthday cake” building. Its architecture blends with the most famous building on campus a mere 100 yards away. . .

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The Grady Gammage Auditorium was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. It was originally supposed to be constructed in Baghdad, but the deal fell through. When ASU President Grady Gammage contacted Wright about building a concert hall for the University, Wright resurrected these plans. Neither Wright nor Gammage lived to see the building completed.

Besides being used for concerts of the University’s large musical ensembles, the 3,000 seat auditorium also hosts Broadway musical touring companies and many cultural and entertainment events open to the public. (The music building above also has a music theater, a concert hall, and a recital hall.)

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The sweeping ramps from the upper level of the building aid in allowing the audience to exit the building quickly after performances.

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ASU also has its own Art Museum.

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The Tempe main campus of ASU covers 661 acres and serves over 42,000 students. It is the fourth largest university in the US. I only photographed a few of the buildings, then headed to the light rail station (a 15 minute walk) for the ride home.

Creative Juice #121

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Creative Juice #121

Ending the year with lots of creative ideas.

 

Creative Juice #119

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Creative Juice #119

Beautiful stuff to inspire you to greater creativity. Get out there and make some art, people.

  1. Sand sculptures.
  2. For the cat lovers.
  3. Quilt show-and-tell.
  4. Beautiful tangles from all over the world, same theme.
  5. The 100 books of 2018 that the New York Times considers notable.
  6. Aachen Cathedral and the wardrobe of Mary.
  7. Crease. Fold. Color.
  8. Favorite recipes. Lovely servingware.
  9. Gorgeous laser-cut light displays.
  10. Prize-winning photography.
  11. Artwork available as prints, posters, shirts, and skateboards.
  12. An artist’s tribute to her dad. (You’ll need a hanky for this one.)

Christmas at Niels Petersen House

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Christmas at Niels Petersen House

I first visited the historic Niels Petersen House in Tempe, Arizona, in the early 1990s. When I stepped into the kitchen, I was hit with a wave of déjà vu. I realized it reminded me of the farmhouse my Uncle Hughie grew up in. (Click the smaller images to enlarge and to view captions.)

 

I recently visited again. In December, the house is decorated for Christmas.

 

 

Niels Petersen, the original owner of the house, was born on October 21, 1845, in Denmark. He served in the English Merchant Marines from 1863-1870, allowing him to travel the world until he decided to immigrate to the United States.

 

In 1871, Petersen arrived in the Salt River Valley of central Arizona, where he staked a homestead claim and begin farming. Four years later, in 1878, Petersen became a United States citizen and subsequently filed a homestead entry, the next step in permanently establishing himself in the valley. The final action in this process was the filing of a homestead proof, providing evidence that improvements to the land had been made by the claimant, which Petersen filed on May 12, 1883. By the time of his final homestead filing, Petersen had built two small adobe houses on the property and maintained 140 acres in cultivation.

 

Petersen acquired more property surrounding his homestead claim. His ranch grew to more than 1,000 acres and Petersen emerged as one of the area’s leading producers of cattle and grain.

By the 1890s, Petersen emerged as one of the Salt River Valley’s wealthiest and most revered citizens. In 1892, he made the decision to construct a new two-story brick home, in the Queen Anne Victorian style, hired Architect James Creighton to design it. Petersen’s house was widely considered one of the most elegant homes in the region.

 

Petersen married twice. His first wife died in childbirth and their son died in infancy. His second wife did not bear any children.

 

After Petersen’s death, the property passed to a distant relative, Rev. Edward Decker. He modified the house somewhat, including adding its one and only bathroom.

 

Only one more family ever lived in the house. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1977. The city of Tempe acquired it in 1979 and restored it.

 

The Niels Petersen House will be open to the public this weekend, December 15 and 16, 2018, from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM. For more information, click here.

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Photographs by ARHuelsenbeck.