Category Archives: Art

#DC341: Go Big (or Go Home)

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Last week’s Diva Challenge was to tangle in a larger format than you usually use. Since I usually make my tangles on a 3-inch tile, I worked in my 5×7-inch sketchbook instead. Having a larger area to cover took a lot more time–three sittings instead of my usual one, which is why I’m posting this so late.

I’m getting into the holiday spirit:IMG_0212

Patterns used: crux, cuidad, heartline, fiore, golvin, moving day, leaflet, static.

Creativie Juice #68

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Creativie Juice #68

A dozen inspiring articles to spark your creativity:

  1. Beautiful Jersey City and Paterson, New Jersey.
  2. Two of my favorite things: quilts and limericks.
  3. Art dolls.
  4. Can creativity be taught?
  5. These new books sound great. Hollywood thought so, too.
  6. This article about Picasso summarizes: “Not only has massive chunks of our culture been created by specific men who abuse women but also that so-called ‘Western culture’ in its entirety has been marked and in many ways defined by systemic and institutionalized misogyny that has chewed up women for art and discarded them en masse.” Some things never change. Or can they?
  7. Do you like potato chips that look like faces, and clouds that look like other objects? Then this quick video will make you smile.
  8. How to draw a fox.
  9. Some beautiful tangles.
  10. What the blank spaces in a painting convey.
  11. Inexpensive copies of art masterpieces you’ll use every day.
  12. Bonsai!

Guest Post: Fall Swirls by Gail Bartel

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Guest Post: Fall Swirls by Gail Bartel

A great big thank you to artist and instructor Gail Bartel for this fabulous painting tutorial. Check out more of her artwork on her blog, that artist woman.

FALL SWIRLS

The trees are a swirl of brightly coloured leaves, or at least they were until we had some really strong winds and they all blew away.

Here is a great little fall project.

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MATERIALS REQUIRED:

– nice paper for painting on

– green masking tape (painter’s tape) optional
– acrylic or liquid tempera paints
– pencil or black pencil crayon
– oil pastels

 

 

 

PROCEDURE:

Tape paper onto art board using masking tape.  This will give us a nice white border.

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Using white and blue paint your background.  You want a white oval off centre and then light blue and darker blue.  Have the kids paint in a circular motion.

Set aside to dry.

This one was with acrylic.

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I did this one with disk tempera to compare.

 

 

 

Starting with brown, paint dashes around our oval.4

With brown we stay away from the white oval.

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We then add orange covering some of our brown dashes and work a little closer into the oval.

 

 

After orange we add yellow.
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As we get into the centre with the yellow add a little white paint to mix a really light yellow.

Set aside to dry.

 

 

 

 

 

When the paint is dry remove the tape.

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With a pencil or black pencil crayon draw your tree trunk.  You want to come from the corner closest to the centre of your swirl.

You want it to look like you are looking up into the tree.

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Using black oil pastel go over your tree trunk lines and fill in.

Now you could just leave it at this point but oil pastel looks better if you blend it a bit.

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In my studio I would just use a paper tortillion but at school we don’t have them around so the kids use a q-tip.

If my lines are quite fine I will take the q-tip and break and use the little broken end to blend my fine branches.

 

 

 

Here is a comparison of acrylic vs liquid tempera.

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The acrylic covers better (more opaque) so your lights are brighter.  For the liquid tempera I added some dashes in pencil crayon in orange, yellow, and light yellow to help with this after the paint was dry.

Gail

 

 

 

Review of The Great Zentangle Book by Beate Winkler (CZT) and Friends

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Review of The Great Zentangle Book by Beate Winkler (CZT) and Friends

This is my favorite Zentangle® book right now. Subtitled Learn to Tangle with 101 Engaging Patterns, the book breaks down each pattern into clear steps. This step by step design is key, because many of the completed patterns look way more complicated than they actually are.

Also, each pattern has several examples of the design being combined with other patterns, and showing possible ways to shade for depth and dimension.

The book also explains the history, benefits, and philosophy behind Zentangle, besides listing recommended materials.

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What makes this book different from other Zentangle books I’ve reviewed is the way each pattern gets its own page. There’s plenty of room for as many as nine step-outs and for Beate’s (and other Certified Zentangle Teachers’) comments about each pattern. There’s even a glossary of terms in the back.

I know that step-by-step directions are available on the web (I have a whole board of Zentangle designs on Pinterest), but looking them up can be tedious. It’s nice to have a good book of patterns that you can just flip through.

Creative Juice #67

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Creative Juice #67

A lot of incredible photography this week. And some other stuff. Enjoy!

  1. Sunset in.
  2. Unfortunately, most of the things I make are like something I’ve seen. How do we acquire the courage to experiment with an original design?
  3. I <heart> NY!
  4. This would be a fun art project to do with kids.
  5. Three friends travel through Europe, following Van Gogh’s footsteps to gain insight into his art.
  6. “Illustwriter” Hallie Bateman talks about inspiration.
  7. Gorgeous quilts!
  8. Amazing photographs of birds.
  9. Just 30 seconds of Christmas decorations at Radio City Music Hall in New York City.
  10. Liquid rugs.
  11. How does this happen? People in art museums blending in with the artwork
  12. Dizzying photographs of a Chinese library.

Video of the Week #123: Walk Where Van Gogh Walked

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Today’s Tangle

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Using patterns brayd, purrlyz, munchin, and luv-a.IMG_0205

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Monday Morning Wisdom #127

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Monday Morning Wisdom #127

THIEVES

#DC339: In the Holiday Spirit

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This week’s prompt for the Diva Challenge is officially “Hallow/autumn,” but I’m taking the suggestion to “get into the holiday spirit.” It’s not too early to put up a Christmas wreath, is it? I’ve used Zentangle patterns keeko, crescent moon, cubine, cadent, cool ‘sista, Hollibaugh, and logjam.IMG_0204

Video of the Week #122: Childhood Home

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Video of the Week #122: Childhood Home