Category Archives: Art

An Interview with Quilter Frances Arnold

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An Interview with Quilter Frances Arnold

Frances Arnold is a quilter, blogger, instructor, speaker, world traveler, and accountant. She recently answered questions about her quilting for ARHtistic License.

Why quilts? What is it about quilt-making that captivates you?
FA: That is a great question and, honestly, I don’t know why I ended up with quilting. I come from a long line of Texas quilters and my Mom made quilts when I was growing up, but they were all large quilts, done entirely by hand, and each took a year to make. This didn’t appeal to me at all!! But what she did teach me was that handmade items were special and were to be cherished. Instead of quilting, I tried knitting, crocheting and needlepoint, then transitioned to crewel embroidery and finally counted cross-stitch. When I was 28, one of my friends from church was teaching quilting and I took her class. Her quilting was different…she did small projects that could be finished in a reasonable amount of time and even used the sewing machine at times. Once I started, I was hooked and haven’t really looked back since then. After 35 years of quilting, I LOVE the feel of the fabrics, the precision of the piecing and the texture of the quilting.

Casa Amarella

“Casa Amarella” (2009) – 19×23 – This quilt was based on a photo from Porto, Portugal

You’re an accountant. How do you make time for quilting?
FA: When my first child was born 34 years ago, my husband and I decided that we would do our best to keep me at home with our kids. Over the years, I developed my accounting practice, just a few clients in the early years and a more substantial practice now. I work out of my home which allows me a lot of flexibility. In the past year, I have been planning my time using “block scheduling” which means that I set certain time aside for being in the studio. It has definitely helped my creativity.

Complements under the Canopy

“Complements Under the Canopy” (2012) – 40×40 – The guild challenge was “Complementary colors” and the inspiration was from photos taken at the Xishuabana Tropical Botanical Garden in Southern China.

Do you ever use commercial patterns, or do you always design your own?
FA: Like most quilters, I started out picking 3 fabrics (a light, a medium and a dark) and working straight from a published pattern. As time went on, I thought “what would happen if I made this one change”, and then another change and before I knew it I was making quilts almost entirely from my original designs. Although I sometimes use commercial patterns now, my preference is to design my own.

Blue Light Special

“Blue Light Special” (2014) – 42×45 – This was based on a photo taken inside the Blue Mosque in Istanbul, Turkey. The inspiration came from a “six-pointed star” challenge in my local guild. The thought was triggered when the instructions talked about this type of star being prevalent in the Islamic religion.

Where do you get your inspiration?
FA: EVERYWHERE!!! I am always taking photos of things that remind me of quilts and even have my husband looking as well. He often sends me photos of things that he sees!!

Flower Pots, Flower Pots

“Flower Pots, Flower Pots” (2012 ) – 86×105 – This was the second quilt that my Mom and I worked on together. She did the appliqué and I put the top together and the machine quilting. It is one of my favorite quilts!!

What’s your favorite kind of quilt to make?
FA: This is a hard question because I like so many different types of quilts. In the last 10 years I have made a number of quilts based on inspirations from overseas trips that my husband and I have taken. He often works overseas for extended periods of time and I accompany him as often as I can. Since 2017 we have spent 64 weeks overseas, making 20 trips to 11 different countries, including Italy, Portugal, Austria, Colombia, Australia, China, India and Nepal.
But, on the other hand, I LOVE finding a fun pattern and making a good old scrap quilt. I find them relaxing to make and a good distraction when I am “stuck” on something that needs more designing and thinking!!

Mother Daughter Flower Garden

“Mother, Daughter Flower Garden” (2009) – 90×108 – This was the first quilt that my Mom and I made together. She had made tons of appliqué flower blocks but was planning to just throw a sashing between them and call the top finished. I told her that the beautiful blocks deserved more, so ended up finishing the top and doing the quilting.

What are your favorite colors?
FA: I would say that I don’t have a favorite color, but my stash would say differently as it is overflowing with jewel tones. More than a particular color, I am drawn to bright fabrics…dull tones just don’t do it for me!

Peacock Pavillion

“Peacock Pavilion” (2008) – 35×40 – While visiting the Mysore Palace in India, I was enamored with a stained glass peacock window. Since no photos were allowed, I sketched a rendition and immediately came home and designed this quilt.

Do you quilt by hand or on a sewing machine?
FA: Most of my work is done by machine but I am trying to add some hand appliqué back in…mainly to give me something to do at night while sitting with my husband.

Rainbow Pineapples

“Rainbow Pineapples” (2017) – 78×100 – made using Gyleen Fitzgerald’s pineapple ruler and started during a guild retreat. This quilt was juried into the International Quilt Festival (Houston) in 2018.

What sewing machine do you use? What do you like about it?
FA: I have a Juki 2200 QVP Mini, which is a straight stitch machine. It is a true workhorse and I love it!! It moves easily between piecing and machine quilting and has all the features that I ever need. IF I need to do a zig-zag stitch, I move back to my previous machine, a Viking Lily. It too was a great machine, but I wanted something with a little more harp space that would make machine quilting easier.

Pueblo Nation

“Pueblo Nation” (2014) – 42×44 – This quilt was part of our guild’s “Nation” challenge. The design was based on photos that we took while visiting the pueblos in Taos, New Mexico.

What is your fabric-shopping strategy? Do you usually have a particular quilt in mind when you go to the fabric store, or do you buy whatever strikes your fancy?
FA: I wish that I could call it a strategy, but mostly it is a matter of attraction and opportunity. Many of my quilts are made without purchasing any fabric but sometimes I go out looking for that one special fabric.

Escala Azule

“Escala Azule” (2009) – 18×23 – Also from Porto, Portugal, this quilt is a reminder of the LONG set of stairs that I climbed after learning that the “sky lift” wasn’t working.

How many unfinished projects do you have right now? (Is that an unfair question?)
FA: Personally, I don’t have tons of unfinished projects…the oldest one is based on train passengers in the London Underground. It has been a UFO for almost 10 years!!! Having said that, my Mom passed away in 2017 and left me EIGHT of her UFO’s!! Right now, I am trying to figure out exactly which ones I want to finish and which I want to donate to my guild charity group. [Note: click on the smaller photos below to enlarge and read the captions.]

You’re a guild member. How has that affected your journey as a quilter?
FA: Being a member of a local guild has been instrumental in the growth of my art. Many of my closest friends are from my guild and all have inspired me and encouraged me to keep pushing onward. The programs and workshops have helped me to look at new techniques and to think about quilting in different ways. I think that every quilter should be in a guild!

Whose quilt designs do you admire?
FA: There are too many to name. I am truly enamored with the free motion machine quilting that is being done now, particularly in the modern quilt genre. I am inspired every time I thumb thru the newest magazine, check out the latest websites, or observe the “show and tell” at our guild meetings.

You travel around the southeast giving presentations to quilters. What especially do you like to teach/talk about?
FA: My favorite guild talk is “Viewing the World Thru Quilt Colored Glasses” where I mix travel photos with the quilts that they inspired. When I first started giving this talk, I spent more time talking about the travel side, but now I have so many quilts made from these inspirations that I keep having to cut more and more of the travel photos out.
I also have talks about using photographs in quilts (Out of the Scrapbook and onto the quilt), and about making quilts the size that you want (Size Matters). I am currently in the process of developing another talk about use of color in quilts.
I also enjoy teaching “Beginning Machine Quilting” workshops, trying to convince participants that they are capable of quilting their own quilts…even BIG ones.

The Tiles of San Giovani

“The Tiles of San Giovani” (2018) – 46×46 – After visiting the Church of San Giovani in Rome and taking 97 photos of the tile floors, this was the quilt that was born.

Is there anything else you would like readers to know about your quilts?
FA: My quilts are definitely an extension of my life and the creativity involved is what keeps me sane!! My goal for 2019 and 2020 is to “up my quilting game” by improving both the technical side of my quilts as well as their creative aspects. So far, I am truly enjoying this journey!!

Frances Arnold

Frances Arnold

 

Creative Juice #155

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Creative Juice #155

We stand on the shoulders of creative giants. Give yourself a boost with these twelve articles.

An Interview with Vesna Taneva-Miller

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An Interview with Vesna Taneva-Miller

Meet Vesna Taneva-Miller, folk dancer, quilter, painter, jewelry maker, crocheter and crafter. I’ve had the pleasure of knowing her for years, since she dances with the Phoenix International Folk Dancers, but I didn’t know how talented she is in the arts until another dancer told me she saw a rope bowl made by Vesna featured in Phoenix Magazine. (Click this link and scroll down. It’s in the Textiles and Home Décor section.)

You are a wife, the mother of two children, and you work for Alaska Airlines. How do you find time for your art?

I don’t always find time, and I am not always a perfect mother and wife.  It’s not like I have dinner ready, dishes done, laundry folded and put away and now it’s time for art.  Sometimes none of those things are done, but I am at my table creating because that’s what I need to do at that time.  It’s really give and take and you put time and effort into the things that matter.

Vesna cropped-image1

You’re active in many media: drawing, painting, jewelry making, sewing, crochet—have I missed any? What is your favorite way to make art?

Ah gosh, I don’t have a favorite.  I go through cycles, so I have times when doing watercolors is my favorite.  A few months later sewing is my favorite and so on.  Sometimes I am a bit jealous at artist that focus on one media and get really good at it.  I am not a master at anything, I just like to try everything.

What inspires you to create?

Many things.  Nature for sure. Places, experiences, feelings. Other artists.

Vesna Taneva-Miller; art; Zentangle

Zentangle gems

Do you have your own dedicated workspace for making art?

I am lucky that I do.  It’s an addition to the back of our house that was already there when we bought it.  It didn’t initially have a/c but we added a window unit.  It’s always in a state of disarray, a total mess, much like the rest of my home.

Do you have a theme or an underlying message in your art?

I love bright colors.  For me it represents life and playfulness, easygoingness, peace, comfort.

Vesna Taneva-Miller; art; jewelry

Snowflake pins

Some of your art is sold through Art-o-mat. Tell me how that works.

Art-o-mat is a community of artist that sell small pieces of original and affordable art at $5 in vending machines that formerly were cigarette vending machines.  I first saw it at the Vision Gallery – downtown Chandler, AZ.  They have one.  I bought a few pieces of art and was hooked and wanted to be a part of it.  Each piece is handmade, so therefore an original.  It’s the size of a box of cigarettes and it’s like a surprise machine for adults.  You put in a coin, you choose an artist represented by a small plaque and possibly what you may be getting, but each piece is different so you never know what you get until you get it.

Vesna Taneva-Miller; crocheted pumpkins

Crocheted pumpkins

You teach for Skillshare. Did you have to shoot your own videos? Is it difficult to give instruction in front of a camera?  

I’ve only done a couple of classes for Skillshare.  [ARHtistic License says: Don’t sell yourself short–I counted six!] I keep breaking my own promise of doing more.  Yes I have to film the videos myself.  Luckily my husband edits them for me, although that’s a struggle for me because I am so uncomfortable with asking for help or asking someone to do something for me.  I do find it difficult to talk in front of the camera with no one standing behind it.  Filming my hands making stuff is much easier for me.

Vesna Taneva-Miller; art; jewelry

Cardboard earrings

What is one of your most favorite pieces that you’ve created, and why?

I am not sure if I have a favorite piece.  I have a lot of fond memories making small art quilts.  Jewelry – necklaces made with fabric.  Doodling mandalas with watercolors.

What is it about creating art that gives you the most satisfaction?

It’s like entering another dimension where you don’t have to worry about whatever is happening in real life.  It’s like an escape.  A coping mechanism.

Vesna Taneva-Miller; art

Cactus from Vesna’s art journal

What challenges have you encountered in your art, and how have you overcome them?

I need to stop comparing myself with others.  It’s a challenge.  It’s really hard in a society of social media where everyone shares their best, mostly.  I have to remind myself that I am me and they are they.  That I just have to keep doing my thing.

What is the best creative advice you’ve ever been given?

Tell your story.  Share your process.  Blog.  Of course I have not been consistent in doing all of these.

Who is your favorite artist?

I have a few: Colette Copeland, Kathy Cano-Murillo, Alisa Burke, Sharon Nullmeyer, Cassie Stephens.

Vesna Taneva-Miller; sewing; crafts

Easter bunnies

What is a project you’re looking forward to making?

One day, hahaha, I’d like to have my home in a perfect state, decorated, custom upholstered, cool murals…….one day, one day.  I ask myself why not today and go crazy at the size of the project.

You love to travel, and your job helps make that possible. Where are some of the places you are planning to go in the future? If you could live anywhere in the world, where would you make your home?

I’d like to go to Iceland.  Also I’ve never been to Montana.  I am not sure that I know where I’d like to make home.  I’ve lived in a few places that I am conflicted.  Each place has part in my heart as home.  So I am not sure for now.

You’re from Macedonia. How did you end up in the United States? Given the current political climate, do you experience discrimination?

I came to the US when I was 16 as an exchange student.  This was in the mid 1990s.  I’ve never felt bluntly discriminated, although I have felt alone and different and that I don’t always belong, or don’t know how to relate even though by now I understand both my culture and this culture very well.  But I am not sure if that’s just a personal issue or discrimination.

Creative Juice #154

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Creative Juice #154

Priceless treasures waiting to be discovered by you:

Guest Post: Young Mother in the Grotto by Rodin from Joy of Museums

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Young Mother in the Grotto 1024px-Rodin_Museum_-_Joy_of_Museums_25

Thank you to Joy of Museums for this photograph and commentary about Young Mother in the Grotto by Rodin.

Auguste Rodin modelled young “Mother in the Grotto” in 1885, and the plaster sculpture was exhibited under the title “Woman and Love”. Several versions in bronze and marble were made during Rodin’s lifetime. The woman and child theme was evident in Rodin’s early body of work during the mid-1880s.

This sculpture represents maternal love in a mythological theme; the baby and the young woman was both sentimental and spiritual. In the later periods of his career, the subject of maternal love is much less prevalent in Rodin’s work as compared to the theme of love between man and woman.

Young Mother in the Grotto by Rodin

The woman, crouching in a grotto and shielding her child from the elements, embodies maternal love and protection. The contrasting textures of the smooth figures against the rough grotto walls highlight the way that human forms can magically emerge from the stone, during the masters’ sculpturing process, as Rodin learnt from studying Michelangelo’s work.

To continue reading this article, click here.

Creative Juice #153

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Creative Juice #153

Twelve articles to inspire you.

In the Meme Time: Habits for Artists

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Habits for Writers