Category Archives: Articles

Hiking in the Arboretum

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Hiking in the Arboretum

Two Fridays ago my daughter Katie invited me to go hiking with her at Boyce Thompson Arboretum. It had been three months since the last time I’d hiked, so I was interested in an easy trail. In Katie’s memory, the High Trail at the arboretum was fairly level.

But to this old lady, it wasn’t. Not that it’s steep, but there are plenty of rises and dips, lots of rocks and steps. I was glad I’d brought my trekking pole; I couldn’t have made it without it.

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The Arboretum is located on 392 acres adjacent to the Tonto National Forest. Its landscape is desert, plus hardy trees and beautiful flowers. Many of the trees have been transplanted from other locations.

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We were fortunate to be there on a Friday, because we had the place seemingly to ourselves. There were plenty of cars in the ample parking, but the arboretum is large enough that you’re not bumping into the other visitors. On the weekends I believe there are larger crowds.

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Boyce Thompson Arboretum, hiking

My daughter Katie ahead of me on the trail.

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An example of the lush forest.

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Interesting rock formations.

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A fallen tree in the eucalyptus forest. Look at the root structure.

We’ve had an unusually dry summer, even for Arizona. Usually we have monsoons in July, and this little stream would actually have water in it.

 

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All the pictures up to this point were taken by me. Unfortunately, my camera’s battery ran out halfway through our hike. Luckily, Katie took some gorgeous pictures with her phone that she was willing to share. All the rest of the pictures in this post are hers.

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Yours truly.

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Garden path.

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Butterflies!

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Wildflowers.

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Shady path.

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Here you can see the roughness of the trail. Not horrible, but not smooth, either.

 

Elements of Fiction

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elements of fiction

Photo by Startup Stock Photos on Pexels.com

If you are writing a story, you must consider how you will handle these seven elements:

Plot—is what happens. It is the action that starts in the beginning, continues through the middle, and wraps up at the end. Action adventure novels and thrillers are often plot-driven, as are some mysteries.

Setting—is where and when the story happens. The story is profoundly affected by the setting. A story that happens in a suburban town in the present will be very different from a story set in the past on a distant planet.

Character—is who the story is about. The people doing the doing. You need at least one. Most novels have an extensive cast of characters. You have a protagonist, and antagonist, the people who support each, and some random individuals. In order for the characters to be believable, they must each need something, and usually what one needs is at odds with what another needs. Each character’s back story (his life before the beginning of the book) must be considered, even if it isn’t shared with the reader. Each person is the way she is because of something that happened in her past. Many, many novels are character-driven. In my opinion, characters are the most important element of fiction.

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Photo by Startup Stock Photos on Pexels.com

Point of view—is the perspective of the person narrating the story or scene. It’s okay to have multiple narrators, but make sure it’s always clear to the reader whose head he’s in at any given time. Generally, it is confusing to change POV within a single scene.

Point of view can be first person, second person, or third person.

First person is when the story is being told by a character, either the protagonist, the antagonist, or a secondary character, using his own words and voice, using the pronouns I, me, my, mine, we, us, our, and ours.

Second person is when the story is being told about and to a person: you did this, you said that. The second person is rarely used in fiction, because it is hard to pull off for a long period of time, but I have seen it successfully used in a memoir that a parent wrote for his child, specifically about the child’s childhood.

Third person can be the viewpoint of a person removed from the story, the invisible author. Pronouns used would be he, she, him, her, they, their, etc. The third person narrator could be omniscient, all-knowing, like God. God knows everyone’s deepest thoughts, and the omniscient narrator does, too, and shares them with the reader. This is the way classical literature was written.

However, contemporary fiction favors an objective third person view point, where the narrator tells only what is observable. That means the writer is very limited about how thoughts are shared. Generally, if a character is alone, we can hear her thoughts. In other scenes, a viewpoint character can be selected, and the story is told through what he can observe, and possibly also through his thoughts. But again, it must be clear to the reader whose head he’s inside. And also, if the reader wonders how a character knows something based on what should be observable to him, the reader will disconnect from the story.

elements of fiction

Conflict—there is no story without conflict. There are two types of conflict, external and internal. An external conflict involves a problem which exits outside of the character, such as a problem with another character or an institution, or a dangerous situation, like wartime or an avalanche. An internal conflict is a problem or need within the character, such as an addiction, or wanting the object of her desire to notice her. In good full-length fiction, the main character, the antagonist, and some of the supporting characters all experience external and internal conflict. In short fiction, there might only be one conflict.

Theme—is a universal truth that your story illustrates. The theme can be as trite as Believe in yourself or Love makes the world go round, or it can be something the writer is passionate about. You don’t have to beat your theme into the reader, but every chapter should reflect the theme, even subversively, in order to have continuity. If you do not chose a theme for your story, or the story does not adhere to a theme, the reader will sense something is missing and try to find her own theme in it. Do not allow your story to be pointless; your reader will be disappointed.

Symbol—is an item that stands for something else. A ring that stands for power; an heirloom teacup that represents love of family. It’s hard not to include a symbol in fiction. If you don’t consciously put one in, your readers will unconsciously find one. (When I wrote worship drama for my church, my ministry partner was constantly finding symbols in my skits that I hadn’t purposely put in.) So you might as well choose a symbol that relates to your theme, and be sure to refer to it several times in the story.

elements of fiction

Depending on your story, certain elements may fall into place easily, while others may challenge you and send you to the library or a writer’s workshop for help. However, to write successful fiction, you must give consideration to them all.

An Interview with Vesna Taneva-Miller

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An Interview with Vesna Taneva-Miller

Meet Vesna Taneva-Miller, folk dancer, quilter, painter, jewelry maker, crocheter and crafter. I’ve had the pleasure of knowing her for years, since she dances with the Phoenix International Folk Dancers, but I didn’t know how talented she is in the arts until another dancer told me she saw a rope bowl made by Vesna featured in Phoenix Magazine. (Click this link and scroll down. It’s in the Textiles and Home Décor section.)

You are a wife, the mother of two children, and you work for Alaska Airlines. How do you find time for your art?

I don’t always find time, and I am not always a perfect mother and wife.  It’s not like I have dinner ready, dishes done, laundry folded and put away and now it’s time for art.  Sometimes none of those things are done, but I am at my table creating because that’s what I need to do at that time.  It’s really give and take and you put time and effort into the things that matter.

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You’re active in many media: drawing, painting, jewelry making, sewing, crochet—have I missed any? What is your favorite way to make art?

Ah gosh, I don’t have a favorite.  I go through cycles, so I have times when doing watercolors is my favorite.  A few months later sewing is my favorite and so on.  Sometimes I am a bit jealous at artist that focus on one media and get really good at it.  I am not a master at anything, I just like to try everything.

What inspires you to create?

Many things.  Nature for sure. Places, experiences, feelings. Other artists.

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Zentangle gems

Do you have your own dedicated workspace for making art?

I am lucky that I do.  It’s an addition to the back of our house that was already there when we bought it.  It didn’t initially have a/c but we added a window unit.  It’s always in a state of disarray, a total mess, much like the rest of my home.

Do you have a theme or an underlying message in your art?

I love bright colors.  For me it represents life and playfulness, easygoingness, peace, comfort.

Vesna Taneva-Miller; art; jewelry

Snowflake pins

Some of your art is sold through Art-o-mat. Tell me how that works.

Art-o-mat is a community of artist that sell small pieces of original and affordable art at $5 in vending machines that formerly were cigarette vending machines.  I first saw it at the Vision Gallery – downtown Chandler, AZ.  They have one.  I bought a few pieces of art and was hooked and wanted to be a part of it.  Each piece is handmade, so therefore an original.  It’s the size of a box of cigarettes and it’s like a surprise machine for adults.  You put in a coin, you choose an artist represented by a small plaque and possibly what you may be getting, but each piece is different so you never know what you get until you get it.

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Crocheted pumpkins

You teach for Skillshare. Did you have to shoot your own videos? Is it difficult to give instruction in front of a camera?  

I’ve only done a couple of classes for Skillshare.  [ARHtistic License says: Don’t sell yourself short–I counted six!] I keep breaking my own promise of doing more.  Yes I have to film the videos myself.  Luckily my husband edits them for me, although that’s a struggle for me because I am so uncomfortable with asking for help or asking someone to do something for me.  I do find it difficult to talk in front of the camera with no one standing behind it.  Filming my hands making stuff is much easier for me.

Vesna Taneva-Miller; art; jewelry

Cardboard earrings

What is one of your most favorite pieces that you’ve created, and why?

I am not sure if I have a favorite piece.  I have a lot of fond memories making small art quilts.  Jewelry – necklaces made with fabric.  Doodling mandalas with watercolors.

What is it about creating art that gives you the most satisfaction?

It’s like entering another dimension where you don’t have to worry about whatever is happening in real life.  It’s like an escape.  A coping mechanism.

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Cactus from Vesna’s art journal

What challenges have you encountered in your art, and how have you overcome them?

I need to stop comparing myself with others.  It’s a challenge.  It’s really hard in a society of social media where everyone shares their best, mostly.  I have to remind myself that I am me and they are they.  That I just have to keep doing my thing.

What is the best creative advice you’ve ever been given?

Tell your story.  Share your process.  Blog.  Of course I have not been consistent in doing all of these.

Who is your favorite artist?

I have a few: Colette Copeland, Kathy Cano-Murillo, Alisa Burke, Sharon Nullmeyer, Cassie Stephens.

Vesna Taneva-Miller; sewing; crafts

Easter bunnies

What is a project you’re looking forward to making?

One day, hahaha, I’d like to have my home in a perfect state, decorated, custom upholstered, cool murals…….one day, one day.  I ask myself why not today and go crazy at the size of the project.

You love to travel, and your job helps make that possible. Where are some of the places you are planning to go in the future? If you could live anywhere in the world, where would you make your home?

I’d like to go to Iceland.  Also I’ve never been to Montana.  I am not sure that I know where I’d like to make home.  I’ve lived in a few places that I am conflicted.  Each place has part in my heart as home.  So I am not sure for now.

You’re from Macedonia. How did you end up in the United States? Given the current political climate, do you experience discrimination?

I came to the US when I was 16 as an exchange student.  This was in the mid 1990s.  I’ve never felt bluntly discriminated, although I have felt alone and different and that I don’t always belong, or don’t know how to relate even though by now I understand both my culture and this culture very well.  But I am not sure if that’s just a personal issue or discrimination.

Happy First Day of School

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Happy First Day of School

It’s the first day of school, and I’ve been called in on an emergency basis to fill in at the elementary school where I used to teach. Since I’ve been gone, the entire staff has left and been replaced by people I don’t know. Also, the locations of all the classrooms, offices, cafeteria, and library have changed. I can’t find my music classroom. I don’t have the main office number listed on my phone.

When I finally locate the music room, it’s filled with unruly students running around and using the ceiling light fixtures as trapeze swings, no responsible adults in sight. They’ve just been dropped off, and I have no idea what grade they are or when they will be picked up. I have no class list. I have no schedule. I don’t know what books, supplies, or instruments I have or where they would be located. I have no strategy for getting the students under control, no first-day activities planned.

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No, this didn’t really happen, but it is a recurring dream I’ve had frequently in the five years since I resigned from teaching. I’ve also had variations on this dream: my new classroom is a cabana on the beach and I have to keep my kindergarten students from drowning in the surf; it’s the day of the big musical performance and I’ve forgotten to cast or rehearse it.

And it’s similar to dreams that even veteran teachers have about being unprepared for the first day or for back-to-school night.

I actually always loved the first few weeks of school. Everything was fresh; the students were well-behaved, confident that this new year would be the best yet. The students at my school had new clothes and backpacks and pristine supplies to begin their classes. The impetus of novelty continued while the kids were challenged to progress to the next level.

This is the first year that I didn’t have a pang of regret on the first day of school. I like retirement enough that I’m not missing the back-breaking labor of setting up my classroom (teachers spend the day after the last day of school clearing their classrooms so that annual maintenance like deep-cleaning and painting can happen over the summer). I still miss the vibrance of working with kids, but my students who were kindergarteners when I resigned are now in sixth grade (not my favorite age group). I don’t think I could pick up where I left off.

The schools in my neck of the woods opened a few weeks ago, but when we lived in New Jersey, the traditional start of school was the day after Labor Day. Best wishes to all who are starting out this week. Give your teachers a hug for me.

An Interview with Author Victoria Thompson

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An Interview with Author Victoria Thompson

Victoria Thompson is the popular author of twenty-two romance novels, the historical Gaslight Mystery series (twenty-two books and counting), and the Counterfeit Lady novels (Book 3 coming out soon).

I have to brag that I’ve know Vicki since 1982. When my second child was born, she was my La Leche League leader. Soon afterward, she started a Bible study group for young mothers, and she was instrumental in leading me back to the Lord.

She was also the first person I’d ever known to actually have a book published.

Vicki graciously agreed to be interviewed for ARHtistic License.

What was your undergraduate major?

VT: English/Secondary Education; I like to say I’m a retired teacher—I taught one year and retired!  This was in a public Middle School in 1970.

You teach writing popular fiction in the Masters program at Seton Hill University. How did that come about?

VT: I was invited to teach in the program when it was just getting started in 2000.  A writer friend recommended me.

I’ve heard your books characterized as “cozy” mysteries. What constitutes a cozy?

VT: A “cozy” or traditional mystery is defined as a subgenre of crime fiction in which sex and violence are downplayed or treated humorously, and the crime and detection take place in a small, socially intimate community. That doesn’t mean a small town, necessarily, although many traditional mysteries are set in small towns.  It just means the group of suspects are members of a small social community, i.e. friends, family members, members of a church or club, etc.

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Are you a plotter or a pantser?

VT: Yes. My process is actually somewhere in the middle. I come up with my victim and the cast of suspects before I start writing, but I have no idea who the killer is or what exactly will happen, so I just wing it from there.

Why historical fiction?

VT: I love history and I love exploring how human nature has not really changed ever. The technology is different, but people are not. They are still concerned about the same things now as they were a hundred years ago. I have tried writing contemporary novels, but they just never quite click, for some reason. I think I just have a naturally historical voice and sensibility.

How do you do your research?

VT: I have three sets of bookshelves full of reference books in my office that I consult, but it’s also very easy to use Google for things as well. I don’t even have to get out of my chair! Google will often lead me to a specific reference book and if it’s not available any other way, I’ll get it from the library or inter-library loan.

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How long does it take you to write a book?

VT: Around 6 months, including research and “thinking.”

What is the most fun part of writing a book?

VT: Getting to that point in the book where you realize you’ve got all the clues in place, you know who the killer is and why they did it and all you have to do is write it up so others can read it. For me, this usually happens around 2/3-3/4 of the way through the manuscript.

Who is your agent, and how did you connect?

VT: My agent is Nancy Yost. We have been together about 25 years (neither of us remembers exactly when she took me on).  She was originally my editor for two books I wrote for Avon.  I had just hired a new agent when she told me she was leaving Avon to become an agent.  Two years later, I fired that agent and went with Nancy.

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Victoria Thompson

What is something about your books or about yourself that you wish your readers knew?

VT: I have very little control over the cover art (I do get to approve it or suggest changes), and no control at all over when or how often the books are published and how much they cost. Also, I’d love to write 12 books a year, to keep my fans happy, but that’s physically impossible.

 

Mathew Brady, the Father of Photojournalism

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Mathew Brady, the Father of Photojournalism

Born around 1822 in Warren County, New York, the youngest of three children of Irish immigrants, Mathew Brady at age 16 moved to Saratoga, New York, where he met and studied with the portrait painter William Page. In 1839, Brady and Page traveled to New York City, where they connected with Samuel F.B. Morse, Page’s former teacher. Morse had recently returned from France, where he had collaborated with Louis Jacques Daguerre, the inventor of the daguerreotype, an unwieldy camera devise which produced images on silver-plated copper sheets treated with mercury vapor. Morse enthusiastically promoted the daguerreotype in the United States, and Brady assisted him in this endeavor, originally by making leather cases for them. When Morse opened a photography studio and offered lessons, Brady was his first student.

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Cavalry Column at the Rappahannock River, Virginia

In 1844, Brady opened his own photography studio at Broadway and Fulton Street in New York City. He took portraits, including those of such notables as Senator Daniel Webster, poet Edgar Allan Poe, and elderly former President Andrew Jackson. In 1849, he opened a studio on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C., where he met Juliet Handy, whom he married in 1850. (They made their home on Staten Island.) Brady’s early images were daguerreotypes, but as technology advanced, he switched to the albumen print, a paper photograph produced from large glass negatives.

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Battery in action at Fredricksburg.

When the Civil War first broke out, Brady advertised portraits and small-sized prints of departing soldiers, reasoning that their parents and loved ones might want an image of the son, brother, husband, or boyfriend they might never see again.

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Battery D, 2nd US Artillery at Fredericksburg.

But he soon came up with the idea of documenting the war itself. He requested permission from his friend, General Winfield Scott, to travel to the battle sites, and eventually wrote to President Lincoln himself. Lincoln granted permission in 1861, with the understanding that Brady must finance the project himself. (Click on smaller pictures below to enlarge and read captions.)

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Wounded soldiers under the trees after the battle of Spotsylvania.

Most of the time Brady photographed the battlefields after the fighting had ceased, but he came under direct fire at the First Battle of Bull Run, Petersburg, and Fredericksburg. His friends tried to dissuade him from this dangerous and financially risky pursuit, but his adherence to what he perceived as his calling won him a place in history.

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Pontoon Bridge across Rappahannock River

Brady hired twenty-three assistants, each of whom was given a traveling darkroom, to photograph scenes from the Civil War. Brady generally stayed in Washington, D.C., directing his assistants, and rarely visited battlefields personally. Though actually snapping the picture was important, the selection of the scene to be photographed was also a significant contribution.

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Behind Union breastworks on Little Round Top at Gettysburg, PA.

Brady’s use of assistants may have been due, at least in part, to the fact that his eyesight had begun to deteriorate. Brady was criticized for failing to document the photographs, making it difficult to discern not only who took the picture, but also exactly when or where it was taken.

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Camp scene showing winter huts and corduroy road.

In October, 1862, Brady opened an exhibition of photographs from the Battle of Antietam in his New York gallery, titled The Dead of Antietam. Many images in this presentation were graphic photographs of corpses, a presentation new to America. This was the first time that many Americans saw the realities of war in photographs, as distinct from previous “artists’ impressions”.

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Mathew Brady in 1875

Mathew Brady, through his many paid assistants, took thousands of photos of American Civil War scenes. Much of the popular understanding of the Civil War comes from these photos. Thousands of photos taken by Brady and his associates, Alexander Gardner, George Barnard and Timothy O’Sullivan are stored in the US National Archives and the Library of Congress. The photographs’ subjects include Lincoln, Grant, and soldiers in camps and battlefields. Brady was not able to photograph actual battle scenes, as the photographic equipment in those days was limited in its technical development and required that a subject remain still in order for a clear photo to be produced. Following the conflict, a war-weary public lost interest in seeing photos of the war, and Brady’s popularity and practice declined drastically. Nevertheless, Brady’s images provide a pictorial cross reference of American Civil War history.

Information and images for this article came from Wikipedia and from the National Archives.

An Interview with Author Sara Fujimura

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An Interview with Author Sara Fujimura

Sara Fujimura is the talented author of Tanabata Wish (2017), Breathe (2018), and Every Reason We Shouldn’t (releasing March 3, 2020). You can learn more about her on her website. Fujimura recently answered questions for ARHtistic License.

 

You’re a white woman married to a Asian man. Your family celebrates your dual heritage. You’ve written about raising bicultural children, and characters in two of your books are biracial. This is obviously an issue close to your heart. Has your family experienced prejudice? What advice do you give to other biracial families?

Tanabata Wish

SF: Toshi and I have been married for 26 years now though we’ve been friends since I was seventeen. We have two college-aged kids, one son and one daughter. We spend about a month each summer in a very rural part of Gifu Prefecture with their Japanese grandparents. My first YA book, TANABATA WISH, is not an autobiography, but my long-time friends can pick out the true parts based on my annual summer missives from Japan via Facebook. I’ve been writing about bicultural life for a long time. First as magazine articles and later as young adult books. I have a large number of biracial and/or bicultural teens and young adults in my life, so it only makes sense that my work reflects the group of now college-aged kids you will see in my living room playing videogames on any given Saturday night. I have been reading YA books for twenty years, and there has never been a shortage of YA books in my house, yet we lost both of my children (especially my son) to anime, manga, and Japanese TV because they didn’t see themselves represented very often. Seriously, werewolves are easier to find in YA books than Asian or biracial Asian guys as the main character. Within the last few years, that has begun to change, so I hope we won’t lose another generation of boys. Yes, we have felt prejudice both here and in Japan. All I can suggest is keep pushing against the stereotypes and speaking up for your kids. Also, try to find books and other forms of media that your kids can see themselves in.

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What sort of research did you need to do for your historical novel, Breathe?

SF: Tons and tons and tons. TANABATA WISH was relatively easy because it came out of my real life and many of the experiences my family has had. BREATHE is set in Philadelphia against the great Spanish flu pandemic of 1918. My degree is in Public Health Education, and deadly diseases have always been my jam. Most of the medical details (especially the grossest parts) came directly from first person accounts from that time period. But that was only the tip of the research iceberg. I read newspaper articles, women’s fashion magazines from the time, listened to popular songs from 1918, watched the original 1918 TARZAN OF THE APES silent movie, looked through historical photos from the women’s suffrage movement, ate a lot of vintage candy in the name of research, and spent a good chunk of time in Philadelphia in all the major settings of BREATHE. I didn’t want to write a textbook but know that even what might look like a throwaway line has a purpose. If you want to dive deeper and go behind the scenes of BREATHE, you can go to my blog at: https://saraffujimura.com/blog. Are you a science teacher, history teacher, or homeschooler? I have high school-level curriculum tie-ins to BREATHE created by local high school teachers on the blog too.

 Your soon-to-be-released book, Every Reason We Shouldn’t, is about ice skating. Is that a sport that you’ve participated in?Every Reason We Shouldn't

SF: EVERY REASON WE SHOULDN’T is about perfectionism and the high cost that comes with being number one. I like to say that it is like THE CUTTING EDGE meets YURI ON ICE. At sixteen, Olivia is a washed-up Olympic-level pairs figure skater trying to figure out how to be a normal teen. Jonah, 15, is chasing his Olympic dream: To be the next Apolo Ohno. Jonah simultaneously needles Olivia, inspires her, and reignites her flame. I do own a pair of ice skates, but I am much better at roller skating (which is why there is also roller derby in this book). Just like my other books, I have other people who are much more knowledgeable about different topics look over my work. No spoilers but Olivia and Jonah’s signature move came directly from my beta reader who was a competitive skater. What I had originally would have been fine, but Katie’s knowledge took it to the next level.

Where does your inspiration come from?

SF: Real life. Even for BREATHE. I pull strings from real places, people, conversations, and experiences and weave them into new stories. For EVERY REASON WE SHOULDN’T, I actually had Jonah’s character down first even though Olivia ended up telling the story. Jonah was very much inspired by reading Apolo Ohno’s autobiography, specifically the part about when he was a teenager. I have two one-in-a-million girls like Olivia in my life who I’ve watched blossom into young women. There are a lot of super talented teens out there, but I wanted to write about an amped up version of what a lot of talented teens go through. Just because you are the star at your local dance studio doesn’t guarantee that you’ll dance on Broadway. ERWS is about gifted teens at a crossroad when pure talent is no longer enough. Do you quit? Do you keep going?

Why do you write for young adults?

SF: I love to read and write YA for the same reason: The sense of hope. Though the path might be difficult, anything is still possible. Also, the sense of newness and how the world begins to open up in your late teens as you break away from your family.

Do you have an agent? Who is your agent, and how did you connect?

SF: I do! Rebecca Angus of Golden Wheat Literary Agency hearted my ERWS pitch during Pitch Wars on Twitter. I signed with her in early January 2018, and she sold ERWS to Tor Teen by the end of March. That said, know that it took me almost twenty years of querying multiple books and enough rejection letters to wallpaper my living room to get to that point.

Sara Fujimura Headshot

Sara Fujimura

What’s up next?

SF: I have two projects I’m actively working on now. One is a screenplay, and the other will be my second contracted book with Tor Teen. I’m still in the beginning stages of both and have endless hours of research ahead of me still (which I kinda love). That’s all I can say right now.

Do you have a funny story about any of your books or about the writing process?

SF: The first time I went to Philadelphia to do research for BREATHE, Philly gave me the worst case of influenza that I have ever had. Being a writer, I took copious notes and wove them into the opening chapters of BREATHE.

What is something about your books or about yourself that you wish your readers knew?

SF: If you go to the local anime cons, you will often see me as my alter ego, The Obento Lady. I sell cute bento boxes and all the things to make your lunch fun and artistic (Bunny-shaped hard-boiled egg mold, anyone?). I made bento for my kids from the time they were 4 and 6 until they finished high school. You can imagine how many plastic baggies didn’t go into the landfill because of that. Sometimes my lunches were fabulous and artistic. Sometimes they were meh, but we still called it a win for Mother Earth. If you see me at events (book or anime), show me your lunch. I am happy to give it a makeover.