Category Archives: Humor

Creative Juice #238

Standard
Creative Juice #238

Some practical tips. Some laughs. Some nostalgia. Some beauty.

Creative Juice #237

Standard
Creative Juice #237

Beauty and fun.

Creative Juice #227

Standard
Creative Juice #227

Topics serious and entertaining:

Creative Juice #224

Standard
Creative Juice #224

On Tuesday, my husband’s podiatrist told us she got her flu shot. Somehow, that fills me with hope for 2021. So do these awesome articles:

  • This one made me cry. The video is too echo-y. Scroll down and read the essay.
  • Writer’s playlist.
  • When we can travel again, maybe we can go to Mexico.
  • This article from 2018 may help you set your creative goals for 2021.
  • 12-year-old Jesus didn’t have all the answers.
  • Interesting shots.
  • Everything I know about physicist Richard Feynman I learned from watching The Big Bang Theory. I didn’t know he liked to draw.
  • Good advice. And some not as good. And some I don’t understand.
  • These signs made me laugh.
  • There are reasons why you shouldn’t drive drunk, and there are reasons why you shouldn’t sing drunk. But they’re not the same reasons. Apparently, singing drunk is great fun, and nobody dies. Read about the Australian Pub Choir.
  • A quilter shares the 17 quilts she made in 2020.
  • This is an interesting idea: praying with index cards.

Creative Juice #222

Standard
Creative Juice #222

Merry Christmas! May God’s Love indwell you today and always.

  1. Beautiful (and humorous) embroideries.
  2. Zentangle + pottery.
  3. A quilter grows through the years.
  4. An Andy Warhol exhibit from two years ago. I missed this article when it was first posted, but I was happy to come across it now.
  5. The story behind Handel’s Messiah.
  6. I love libraries. Here are how some decorated for Christmas.
  7. The story behind “Silent Night.”
  8. A quilter photographs her many quilts.
  9. The prettiest Christmas cookies I’ve ever seen.
  10. Verdigogh always looks so Christmasy to me. Here’s how several artists interpreted it.
  11. This blog definitely gets the best reader comments. You guys are all going to have to step it up on ARHtistic License. (Let that be one of your New Year resolutions.)
  12. This might be too late for you, so you might want to bookmark it for next year: how to sew gift bags.

Creative Juice #219

Standard
Creative Juice #219

It’s beginning to look a little like Christmas. I put a new Christmas bedspread and pillow shams on our bed.

  • Awesome photographs of nature’s power.
  • For the musicians and the music teachers: young composers get to hear their works performed by the New York Philharmonic.
  • Beautiful zentangles.
  • Ways to beat writer’s block.
  • For the writers: flabby characters? Put them through some exercises.
  • Have you taken your Christmas card picture yet?
  • Ways to use your books to decorate for Christmas. (I am seriously thinking of turning my TBR pile into a tree. The books are already stacked on the floor…)
  • In case you need to laugh, here’s a story about what to do when your husband says you can’t buy any more towels.
  • Some ingenious Christmas tree tools.
  • We all know what we should be doing in order to live our best lives. Read this to get it all in one place.
  • Interview with illustrator Jim Starr.
  • Christmas movies to stream.

Oops.

Standard
Photo by Candace McDaniel

My oldest daughter, Carly, entered kindergarten with seriously advanced reading skills. She was working her way through the Little House on the Prairie series. In school, she was being taught the letters of the alphabet, numbers, counting, and colors. They did have a gifted program, but not for kindergarteners. I fought hard to have her spend part of her day in a first-grade classroom. I was considered a difficult parent.

We lived outside of Trenton, New Jersey, and I began exploring private schools. In nearby Princeton there were schools that catered to advanced students and actively sought them out. I found one that had the resources and experience to work with students like Carly. They offered us a substantial scholarship, and my parents offered to pay most of the rest of her tuition, and that was where she spent the next three years of her education, until we moved to Arizona.

Many of the people who live in the Princeton area are quite wealthy. We are not. It was as though we lived in different worlds.

Parents at the school sometimes threw events at their homes for the parents and/or children in their kids’ classes. You could film an episode of The Crown in their homes. Generations of ancestors looked down on you from the oil portraits on the walls. Birthday parties were elaborate extravaganzas: carnivals, candy hunts, craft parties.

One time I was invited to an “informal reception” in connection with a fundraising drive. Silly me—I saw the word informal and thought it meant casual.

That’s not what informal means in Princeton. At least, not in the late 1980s.

I sewed myself a skirt out of a Hawaiian floral print. I was so happy with the way it turned out. It was bright and colorful—magenta and yellow and green. I paired it with a shocking pink shell and a turquoise over-shirt.

I took three steps into the reception and realized I’d made a horrible mistake.

Everyone was dressed in black, or in black-and-white.

In Princeton, informal is a short step down from formal. So, not ballgowns and tuxedos, but definitely not casual.

And there I was, sticking out like the proverbial neon sore thumb.

I thought about leaving. I thought about bursting into tears. But instead I took a deep breath, smiled, stood up straight, and tried to fit in as best as I could. No one said an unkind word to me. Nobody mentioned my homemade skirt.

For today’s post, I selected an online blogging prompt: Write about a time you were inappropriately dressed for the occasion. This was the first incident that came to mind.

Now it’s your turn. Did you ever show up to an event either over- or under-dressed? Share in the comments below.

How to Write Humor (Roundup)

Standard

I really wish I could write funny stuff. I mean, I’ve written scenes that made my critique group laugh out loud, but actually writing a humor piece—that’s hard.

I’ve been looking for comedy strategies on online, and I’m going to work on some of the ideas in the articles linked below:

Now it’s your turn. I hope to share a project from one of these articles in a future post. Maybe these suggestions will resonate with you, too. If you’re inspired to write a humor piece, please share it in the comments below.

Creative Juice #213

Standard
Creative Juice #213

A dozen articles to inspire you this weekend.

Pandemic Playlist

Standard

Norm Frampton of the popular blog Norm 2.0 recently tweeted:

If 2020 had a soundtrack I’m pretty sure it would be some ominous sounding Gregorian Chants.

I think he’s on to something.

I’ve put together a playlist inspired by the Covid-19 pandemic. In Norm’s honor, let’s start out with some ominous Gregorian chant.

The next selection poses the question we’ve all been asking for the last seven months.

What’s Going On?

One of the dreaded symptoms: Fever

Covid-19 prevention strategies:

Self-quarantine

Wash your hands

Mask up

Social distancing

Finish outstanding projects. It’s said that Mozart worked on his famous Requiem on his deathbed. From the movie Amadeus, Mozart dictating a movement of his Requiem to Salieri:

Remember that Covid-19 can be fatal. Danse Macabre (Dance of Death):

In memory of our loved ones who have passed away during the pandemic. Samuel Barber: Adagio for Strings

Now it’s your turn. What songs would you include in your own personal pandemic playlist? Share in the comments below.