Category Archives: Music

Video of the Week #248: H is for Handbells

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Our handbell choir, Ringing Praise, played “My Jesus, I Love Thee” in church a couple of months ago. I’m the short one in the back.

C is for Covid-19

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This was meant to be part of a series of memes about what to do while self-quarantined. The first one is here. There may be others.

Practice your guitar

Video of the Week #247: B is for Beethoven Concert for an Elephant

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Pianist Paul Barton writes:

Mongkol is a 61-year-old former logging elephant. His captive-held life was spent hauling trees in the Thai forest. His body shape is deformed through hard labor, he lost his right eye and tusk in this brutal logging practice. Mongkol was rescued and brought to Elephants World to spend the rest of his days relaxing peacefully in freedom by the River Kwai. I discovered Mongkol is an extremely gentle, sensitive elephant who enjoys music, especially this slow movement by Beethoven which I play to him occasionally in the day and night.

a-to-z HEADER [2020] to size v2

Kids Making Music

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Kids Making Music

Back in the day, I was an elementary general music teacher. It gives me great pleasure to see kids having fun making beautiful music.

I’ve been a little bummed out, what will being confined to home. It’s affected my blogging life in that I just don’t feel excited about writing about stuff. I couldn’t come up with an idea for today’s post until I thought, What could be better or more life-affirming than kids making music? So I headed to YouTube. (Oh, yeah, like you haven’t been watching cat videos while stuck at home.)

Here are some recorder students in Taiwan:

A six year old at Carnegie Hall:

Three year old drummer:

Kids making music with found objects:

A six-year-old accompanies herself on ukulele:

Kids from all over the world cooperated to make this video. My students used to do this cup thing.

Seven year old guitarist:

You’ll recognize the three pieces in this medley played by nine- and ten-year-olds:

Hey, don’t you have an accordion stored under your bed? This would be a good time to pull it out and practice. . .

Sculpture Saturday: Slit Drum

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Found at the Musical Instrument Museum, Phoenix, Arizona:

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Slit drum.

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Detail of slit drum.

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Detail of slit drum.

See more Sculpture Saturday.

Creative Juice #179

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Creative Juice #179

Art, beauty, and surprises.

  1. These lovely photos make me want to go exploring in the woods.
  2. Best of Beethoven.
  3. Stuff inside of stuff.
  4. Standing out as an artist.
  5. Smithsonian acknowledges the 50th anniversary of I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.
  6. Look! Up in the sky! Anything you can imagine! (Clouds.)
  7. One person’s thoughts on the presidency.
  8. David Hockney makes big money painting swimming pools.
  9. A watercolorist’s journey.
  10. Quilts at Atlanta High Museum.
  11. Check out these beautiful Zentangle® designs.
  12. Wish I could go to this sketching workshop in Mexico City. I love this artist!

Franz Schubert

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Franz Schubert

Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 –November 19, 1828) was an Austrian composer of the late Classical and early Romantic eras.

Schubert’s gift for music was evident from an early age. His father gave him his first violin lessons and his older brother gave him piano lessons, but Schubert soon exceeded their abilities. In 1808, at the age of eleven, he became a pupil at the Stadtkonvikt school, where he became acquainted with the orchestral music of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. He left the Stadtkonvikt at the end of 1813, and returned home to live with his father, where he began studying to become a schoolteacher; despite this, he continued his studies in composition with Antonio Salieri.

One of Schubert’s most famous lieder (art songs), Der Erlkönig, as a shadow puppet animation, with English translation:

In 1814, Schubert met a young soprano named Therese Grob, daughter of a local silk manufacturer, and wrote several of his liturgical works (including a “Salve Regina” and a “Tantum Ergo”) for her; she was also a soloist in the premiere of his Mass No. 1 (D. 105) in September 1814. Schubert wanted to marry her, but was hindered by the harsh marriage-consent law of 1815 requiring an aspiring bridegroom to show he had the means to support a family.

During the early 1820s, Schubert was part of a close-knit circle of artists and students who had social gatherings together that became known as Schubertiads.

Four of Schubert’s brilliant piano impromptus, opus 90, played by Alfred Brendel:

In 1821, Schubert was granted admission to the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde as a performing member, which helped establish his reputation in Vienna. He gave a concert of his own works to critical acclaim in March 1828, his only such concert in his lifetime. He died eight months later at the age of 31, the cause officially attributed to typhoid fever, but believed by some historians to be syphilis.

Schubert was remarkably prolific, writing over 1,500 works in his short career. The largest number of his compositions are songs for solo voice and piano (roughly 630). He completed seven symphonies, and a large body of music for solo piano.

One of Schubert’s most famous symphonies is No. 8, known as The Unfinished Symphony:

Information for this article came from Wikipedia.