Category Archives: Music

Video of the Week #270: Ukulele on Fire

Standard

Video of the Week: Lullaby

Standard

I Need a Handbell Fix

Standard

It’s been five-and-a-half months since Ringing Praise, my church’s handbell choir, has met. I miss my fellow ringers (though we’ve kept up an active text chain), and also the ethereal timbre of our instruments. Join me as I listen to some wonderful handbell performances.

You might enjoy watching these fullscreen (click on the little broken square on the lower right corner of each video).

Milwaukee Handbell Ensemble:

Bohemian Rhapsody:

I am jealous of this group’s bass bells. Dancing Queen:

Hallelujah:

Here’s what happened when the Handbell Musicians of American had their 2020 Symposium online in July:

Let It Go played on handchimes:

Blessed Assurance:

Flight of the Bumblebee:

Farandole:

Lion King medley:

Creative Juice #205

Standard
Creative Juice #205

Lots of pretty stuff here.

  • Do you love hamsters? Then you must follow this artist on Instagram.
  • If 100 of you each want to chip in $4 to buy me this dragon, I won’t stop you.
  • Beautiful star quilt.
  • Books have the power to change people; people have the power to change the world. As for me, The Hate U Give woke me up to white privilege, something I thought didn’t apply to me.
  • Super-realistic drawings done in colored pencil.
  • I love every one of these reading nooks, but my favorites are the ones where you can look out the window at a beautiful view.
  • Interesting zentangle project.
  • Award-winning photos people took with their iPhones.
  • This free mandala-drawing class looks like it will be fun.
  • This article is especially for elementary general music teachers, but if you like music, you might find it very enjoyable.
  • I know I should be doing this. But, somehow, I’m not.
  • This watercolor artist was in her fifties before she began taking her art seriously.

Tchaikovsky

Standard

TchaikovskyPyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (May 7, 1840—November 6, 1893) was the first Russian composer to achieve international recognition.

Though musical from a young age, his parents encouraged him to study law so that he could enter the more lucrative profession of civil service. To please them, he spent nine years at the Imperial School of Jurisprudence, and worked in the Ministry of Justice for four years while studying music on the side. In 1863, he resigned from civil service and became a professor of harmony at the Moscow Conservatory.

Tchaikovsky was greatly influenced by Russian folk music, but also by the Western music he studied while at the St. Petersburg Conservatory.

In 1876, Nadezhda von Meck, the widow of a wealthy railroad magnate and an admirer of Tchaikovsky’s music, offered to become his patron. She provided him with a monthly stipend which allowed him to resign from his professorship in 1878 and pursue composition full time. Her only requirement was that they never meet in person. They did, however, maintain an extensive intellectual correspondence that documents their views on topics from religion to politics to creativity.

Tchaikovsky’s body of work includes 169 pieces, including 7 symphonies, 11 operas, 3 ballets, 5 suites, 3 piano concertos, a violin concerto, 11 overtures and single-movement orchestral works, 4 cantatas, 20 choral works, 3 string quartets, a string sextet, and more than 100 songs and piano pieces. Among his most beloved works are his three ballets (Swan Lake, The Nutcracker, and Sleeping Beauty), his Piano Concerto No. 1, the opera Eugene Onegin, and the 1812 Overture.

 

This sweet little hymn for piano is one of my favorites:

You can learn more about Tchaikovsky at Encyclopaedia Britannica and Biography.

Video of the Week #264: What the Beatles Understood About Musical Theory

Standard

This video is a little longer than what I usually post for Video of the Week, but if you have a little musical knowledge and you’re a fan of the Beatles, you’ll probably love it. If you don’t and you’re not, you’re excused.

Carl Czerny: Pianist, Composer, and Piano Teacher

Standard

400px-Czerny_2

Carl Czerny was born in Vienna, Austria, on February 21, 1791, to parents of Czech heritage. His father was an oboist, organist, and pianist. Carl showed musical talent early, beginning to play piano at age three and starting to compose at seven. His father was his first teacher. His first performance, at age nine, was the Mozart Piano Concerto No. 24.

When Czerny was ten, the Czech composer and violinist Wenzel Krumpholz arranged for the boy to meet Ludwig van Beethoven, who asked him to play the Pathetique sonata and Adelaide. He was impressed with the boy’s playing and agreed to take him on as a student. Czerny premiered Beethoven’s first and fifth piano concertos and maintained a friendship with him for the rest of his life.

At age fifteen, Czerny began teaching piano, basing his method on those of Beethoven and Muzio Clementi. His best-known pupil was Franz Liszt, who came to him with weird technique and awkward movements, but also with obvious talent.

After 1840, Czerny worked exclusively on composition, producing many books of piano exercises in addition to solo piano pieces, chamber music, sacred choral music, and symphonic works.

What Lang Lang says about Czerny’s exercises:

Vladimir Horowitz plays Czerny: Rode Variations

Grand Concerto in A minor:

Information for this article came from Wikipedia.

R.I.P. Ennio Morricone (November 10, 1928–July 6, 2020)

Standard

375px-Ennio_Morricone_Cannes_2012

Ennio Morricone at Cannes Film Festival in 2012; photo by Georges Biard; used under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License

The great, award-winning movie composer Ennio Morricone passed away this morning. He was 92 years old.

You’ve heard his music.

Creative Juice #197

Standard
Creative Juice #197

ABC: Art. Beauty. Creativity.

Video of the Week #260: A Blessing from Hawai’i

Standard