Category Archives: Poetry

Guest Post: Why Writing Poetry Makes for Good Storytelling by Liam Cross

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A big thank you to Liam Cross for this article extoling the virtues about writing poetry (and other genres), which first appeared on A Writer’s Path.

My Unwritten Rules For Writing

Me, personally, I’ve always been a huge believer of two key things when it comes to writing, and those things are: writing every single day in some way, shape or form, and also, branching out in your writing and walking into any unexplored avenue you uncover.

My Philosophy behind it is simple, the idea behind writing every single day is because I like to think of our creativity levels and imaginations as another skill that has to be perfected. Like how a football player must train his feet, us writers must train our imaginations and keep those creative juices flowing, or else the flow will fizzle out.

The same simplicity is applied to my theory of branching out in your writing. The more genres and styles we write in, the more we try out and learn about, the more developed we become as writers.

And sticking with this theory, I believe there’s a very distinct benefit to be had from writing poetry, in terms of your capacity to construct a beautiful and gripping novel-length piece of writing.

 

Poetry and its Secrets

I find poetry to be one of the most expressive forms of writing out there. There are no set rules, no set boundaries; no set regulations, it’s just you, the paper and your pen. And what could be more beautiful than the thought of a blank page coming to life with nothing more than the trapped ingenious thoughts of a writer and a few shabby scrawls of black ink?

To continue reading this article, click here.

Guest Post: How To Become A Better Poet – 7 Ideas To Try Right Now, by Writer’s Relief

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This article has been reprinted with the permission of Writer’s Relief, a highly recommended author’s submission service. We assist writers with preparing their submissions and researching the best markets. We have a service for every budget, as well as a free e-publication for writers, Submit Write Now! Visit our site today to learn more.

FYI

Writing great poetry is very different from writing a great short story or novel. As a poet, you use language in a unique way. Whether you’ve been writing poetry for a while or you’re considering giving it a try for the first time, Writer’s Relief has tips and advice to help you hone your skills and become a better poet. Here are the best ideas for mastering the craft of poetry.

7 Ways To Become A Better Poet

Read other poets. Take a little time every day to read the work of poets you admire—and poets who are new to you. You’ll become familiar with styles and forms and more aware of the current trends. Check out some of the great poetry collections available from your local library. And while you’re reading Shakespeare, Dickinson, and Angelou, be sure to check out the Instapoets too!

Keep a journal. You can jot down notes throughout the day and keep your journal by your bedside to record any inspiration from dreams as soon as you awaken. When you revisit your musings, you might find ideas for your next poem. If you’re worried about what you can fill your journal with, here are some ideas.

Experiment with poetry forms. Trying new poetic forms and meters can improve your skill set and add depth to your poetry. If you normally write in spondaic meter, try iambic, or dactylic for a change. If you typically write sonnets, try your hand at free verse. And even if you never intend to write rhyming poetry, give it a shot and shake up your status quo! You may find the basis for your next poem within those rhyming verses.

Develop a writing schedule. How can you put your free-spirited muse on a schedule? By making writing a habit! Establish a writing routine and let your muse know your new office hours so she can visit more regularly. If you’re not feeling particularly inspired on a given day, try some freewriting to spark your creativity.

Try a new literary device. When used correctly, figurative language such as similes and metaphors can enrich your writing and poetry. Simile compares unlike things that have similarities and uses the words “like” and “as,” while the metaphor is a more direct comparison. Making comparisons can shine a new light on your subject. Alliteration and synecdoche are two other techniques that can enhance your poetry. Here are nine rhetorical devices you might want to try.

Explore other types of writing. Flex your writing muscles by trying another genre. Challenge yourself by writing a short story or a piece of flash fiction. You may discover the beginnings of a prose poem! Experimenting with a new genre will keep your poetry fresh and engaging.

Connect with other poets. Whether in person or online using conferencing platforms, you can join a local poetry writing group, participate in an open mic night, and attend reading events. You can also follow your favorite poets on social media. By interacting with other poets, you’ll learn how they approach writing and pick up new inspiration for your own poetry. Being a member of a poetry writing group will also nudge you to create work on a more consistent schedule.

Try a few (or all!) of these seven ways to boost your creativity—they’re sure to have a positive impact on your poetry writing skills and help you to become a better poet.

Question: Who is your favorite poet?

Creative Juice #197

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Creative Juice #197

ABC: Art. Beauty. Creativity.

Creative Juice #190

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Creative Juice #190

Lots of fun, and one solemn thing:

Creative Juice #189

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Creative Juice #189

Good ideas, along with silly stuff and nerdy stuff.

Creative Juice #188

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Creative Juice #188

Three poems this week, some funny stuff, and some useful information, as well as beauty.

NaPoWriMo Day 30: Go Away

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This is the last day of National Poetry Month–and National Poetry-Writing Month. This is my 24th poem for this year’s challenge.

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Go Away
by ARHuelsenbeck

he’s back
like a bad penny
this time he was gone
for almost two years
he has the sour smell
of someone who’s been
drinking for days

I don’t let him in
go away

don’t be like that
I’m sorry
just let me crash here
I’ll leave in the morning

I close the door
and lock it

he pounds on it
Mary Ann Mary Ann
you’re my last hope

I call 9-1-1
there’s a bum on my doorstep
and he won’t go away

they can’t arrest him
if he hasn’t broken any laws
but I don’t want to wait for that
when the cop car pulls up
he runs away

he’ll be back
maybe tomorrow
maybe next year
he always comes back
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NaPoWriMo Day Twenty-Nine: Tell Me Your History

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Tell Me Your History
by ARHuelsenbeck

What happened to you in
your past life, Ralph?
Why is it that you cringe and
run away when I stoop to
pet you? Why do you refuse
to take a treat from my
hand, but grab it when I
put it on the floor and step back?
Why do you growl at Daddy,
who’s never ever hurt you?

The neighbors laugh when
they see me walking west
with you. They say, “Doesn’t
it defeat the purpose if you
carry your dog on your
walk?” I have to explain
you only walk toward the
house, never away.

You’re so damaged. You
never come when I call you.
I can only touch you when
you are in your safe places,
your little beds throughout the
house. We’ll never know what
happened before you came to
the shelter, a stray. But don’t
worry; you’re safe now.

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NaPoWriMo Day Twenty-Eight: Oma’s Federbett

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Oma’s Federbett
by ARHuelsenbeck

The summer I was nine
my family visited relatives in Germany.
It was the first time my parents
had returned since emigrating to
the US ten years earlier.

Tante Resi’s house was our base of
operations. My grandmother turned her
bedroom over to me. It contained a
wardrobe, a bed, and a nightstand. A door led to
a balcony from which you could see the
garden, the Bavarian village, and the woods beyond.

But the best thing in the bedroom was the
Federbett, literally “feather bed,” a colorful,
puffy ticking envelope filled with feathers.
Today we might call it a down comforter.
I’d never seen one before.

Even though we visited during the summertime,
the temperature plummeted at night, and the
only heat in the house was the wood stove
in the kitchen downstairs. (Heck,
they didn’t even have a bathroom,
but that’s another story.)
The Federbett was so thick
it weighed several pounds. At bedtime,
Tante Resi covered me, and I remained
toasty warm all night.a-to-z HEADER [2020] to size v2

NaPoWriMo Day Twenty-Seven: Noisy

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Noisy
by ARHuelsenbeck

applauding the brilliant performance
burping the ABCs
chortling like a baby
drumming your fingers on the table
ear-splitting screams of terror
foghorns warning of danger
giggling at the silliest faces
hiccupping despite holding your breathe
ick! get that away from me
joking with each other
krunching through the snow
laughing all the way ha ha ha
mumbling an apology
noise inescapable
ouch! that hurts
popping balloons
quarreling like an old married couple
rumbling like an empty stomach
shots fired in the night
tooting horns
ululating uvulas
volume turned all the way up
whistling in the graveyard
x-clamations of joy
yelling at your children
zapping the alien with your ray gunnapo2020button1-1