Category Archives: Sculpture

Sculpture Saturday/ Sunday Trees: Tree Sculptures

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Tree sculptures

Found on the shore of Tempe Town Lake. Doing double duty today for the Sculpture Saturday and Sunday Trees challenges.

Video of the Week #311: Keep Searching Till You Find your Voice

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HERB WILLIAMS “The Call of the Wild” / short documentary from Jeremy Adams on Vimeo.

Creative Juice #247

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Creative Juice #247

You’re bound to find some inspiration in one of these twelve articles.

Creative Juice #245

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Creative Juice #245

Today all my curated articles are from one of my favorite blogs, MyOBT (aka My One Beautiful Thing). Blogger Donna has a daily mission to share one beautiful thing. And she succeeds every day.

Enjoy these? Maybe you should follow MyOBT.

Creative Juice #242

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Creative Juice #242

Awesomely inspiring stuff this week.

Edgar Degas

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Edgar Degas

The French painter and sculptor Edgar Degas (1834-1917) is considered one of the founders of the Impressionist movement.

The Ballet Class by Edgar Degas

His father expected him to study law, for which Edgar had no enthusiasm. He dropped out of law school to enroll in the École des Beaux-Arts. He intended to become a historical artist, and studied the classical techniques.

Dancers at the Barre pastel by Edgar Degas

Degas enjoyed going to the Louvre and copying the work of the masters. It was there that he is said to have met Édouard Manet, one of his influences. Soon he gave up painting historical scenes in favor of depictions of contemporary life. In 1868 painted his first painting with a ballet theme, a subject with which he will forever be identified.

Ballet Rehearsal by Edgar Degas
Ballet Rehearsal by Edgar Degas

In 1872 he visited relatives in New Orleans, and while there produced a number of paintings, including A Cotton Office in New Orleans.

A Cotton Office in New Orleans1873-Degas
A Cotton Office in New Orleans by Edgar Degas

Degas was an organizer of the Impressionist Exhibitions, eight art shows from 1874-1886 that showcased artists who were eschewed by the French Academy Salon. By then he was friends with a number of the Impressionists, including Mary Cassatt, Camille Pissarro, Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Paul Cezanne, and Édouard Manet, although he hated painting outdoors and considered himself a realist.

Dancer Taking a Bow by Edgar Degas

Perhaps one of his most famous works is his sculpture The Little Dancer Aged Fourteen, which critics proclaimed ugly. I’ve loved that statue since I first saw a picture of it when I was a freshman in high school.

Little Dancer Aged Fourteen by Edgar Degas

Creative Juice #235

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Creative Juice #235

Things to try. Things to remember.

Creative Juice #233

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Creative Juice #233

Pretty to look at. Fun to think about.

Forgotten Artist: Rosa Bonheur

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Rosa Bonheur

I recently read a captivating article in the Smithsonian magazine about a French artist I’d never heard of, Rosa Bonheur (March 16, 1822—May 25, 1899). Her story is a perfect topic for Women’s History Month.

Named Marie-Rosalie, she started painting as a child, with a little instruction from her art teacher father, and by copying paintings in the Louvre. By the time she was 26, she was winning awards for her art. Empress Eugénie (the wife of Napoleon III) awarded her the medal of Chevalier of the Légion d’Honneur, the first woman to be so honored for achievement in the arts. Royalty of Mexico, Spain, and Russia also honored her. She was the richest and most famous female artist of 19th-century France. Yet, today, few recognize her name.

Bonheur loved nature, and she collected many pets, such as dogs, sheep, horses, monkeys, lions, and tigers. She produced many detailed, life-like paintings and sculptures of animals. She liked to observe animals up close, often in all-male settings like livestock fairs and slaughterhouses. Wearing the long skirts of the day in such locations would be inconvenient; she had to apply for a special permit to wear male clothing, documented by a letter from her physician that it was required “for reason of health.”

The Horse Fair, Rosa Bonheur 1852-55
The Horse Fair by Rosa Bonheur, 1855-59
640px-Rosa_Bonheur_-_Ploughing_in_Nevers_-_Google_Art_Project
Plowing in Nevers by Rosa Bonheur
Weaning the Calves, Rosa Bonheur 1879
Weaning the Calves by Rosa Bonheur, 1879
A Limier Briquet Hound, Rosa Bonheur 1856
A Limier Briquet Hound by Rosa Bonheur, 1856
Walking Bull, Rosa Bonheur 1846
Walking Bull by Rosa Bonheur, 1846
Shorn Ewe, Rosa Bonheur 1842
Shorn Ewe by Rosa Bonheur, 1842

Rosa Bonheur achieved fame as an artist at a time when most female artists were not even taken seriously. After her death, her work fell out of fashion, but a woman recently purchased Bonheur’s former residence, which she is transforming into a museum of her work. To learn more about Bonheur and the effort to give her the attention she deserves, click the link in the first paragraph of this post.

Sunday Trees/ Sculpture Saturday: Tree Sculpture

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Doing double duty today with Sunday Trees and Sculpture Saturday.