Category Archives: Uncategorized

Guest Post: The Summer of Altoids by Donna

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Thank you to Donna from My OBT for this lovely article.

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These are the adorable miniature paintings inside used mint tins by Heidi Annalise. You know how I love tiny things, and I’ll bet these affordable, wee masterpieces smell great, too! Annalise quit her Washington, D.C. government job (can you blame her?) and returned to her native Colorado to find her bliss. And boy, has she ever found it!

” Floating between realism and impressionism, my artwork adds an element of fantasy to the natural world with heightened colors and simplified shapes. By bringing glimpses of nature into our indoor environments, we can soak up these extraordinary vistas on all of our more ordinary days, and remind ourselves to go exploring whenever we can.”

Annalise was inspired to start painting mint tins by one of her favorite artists, Glenn Dean, who uses Altoids tins to test his works before painting them on a larger canvas.

With 50K+ followers and many happy customers, this artist is living her dream and making the world a cuter, better-smelling place. I have only one question. What does she do with all those mints?

To read the rest of this article, click here.

RIP: Mary Oliver

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September 10, 1935 – January 17, 2019

My heart is heavy. One of America’s greatest poets.

For more about Mary Oliver, click here. And here.

Video of the Day: A Southwestern Way to Celebrate Christmas

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Creative Juice #120

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Creative Juice #120

Christmas is a good time to consider books (they make great gifts, just sayin’) and other beautiful things.

Guest Post: Host Your Own Writers’ Retreat by Fae Rowen

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Thank you to Fae Rowen for this article, which was first published on Writers in the Storm.

 

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Photo by Startup Stock Photos on Pexels.com

It’s been almost ten years since I hosted my first writers’ retreat. It was a low-key get together for my five-person critique group, which had been meeting for just a few months.

We already met weekly for face-to-face chapter critiques, but we wanted time to discuss writing, trade ideas and things we’d learned from books, conferences, and hard work. I volunteered my house and the food (breakfast and lunch).

I made sure all the food was prepared—a quiche and fruit salad for breakfast and a salad bar for lunch, with chocolate goodies for dessert. I wouldn’t have to spend any time “in the kitchen” other than to set out our meals, and I knew everyone would help.

It turned out that life interrupted and only two of us ended up spending our writers’ retreat day together. That turned out to be a really good thing. At that time, Laura Drake and I didn’t know each other that well.

I’d gone through my library and pulled out the craft books that I had duplicates of. I also had a Goal-Motivation-Conflict poster board, gridded off for placing sticky notes for plotting. I piled up my stack of RWA chapter newsletters, a couple of thesauruses, a dictionary and notes with craft and industry tips. Laura brought craft books she no longer needed and magazines, along with books she really liked.

We looked through each other’s offerings and pulled out things we wanted to keep. Actually I think I took all her stuff and she took all mine. It was like an exciting yard sale, because we got to share what we loved and convince each other of the value of our reference books. We talked about plotting—we’re both still pantsers—and GMC. We shared our dreams of getting agents and publishing lots of books.

To continue reading this article, click here.

Guest Post: “The Visit of the Queen of Sheba to King Solomon” by Edward Poynter from The Joy of Museums

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Thank you to The Joy of Museums for the wonderful explanation of this painting:

'The_Visit_of_the_Queen_of_Sheba_to_King_Solomon',_oil_on_canvas_painting_by_Edward_Poynter,_1890,_Art_Gallery_of_New_South_Wales

 

“The Visit of the Queen of Sheba to King Solomon” by Edward Poynter

“The Visit of the Queen of Sheba to King Solomon” by Edward Poynter depicts the story from the Hebrew Bible in which the Queen of Sheba visits Solomon the King of Israel and a son of King David. The Bible describes how the fame of Solomon’s wisdom and wealth had spread so far and wide, that the Queen of Sheba decided to visit and see for herself if the stories were real.

The queen came bearing gifts including gold, spices, and precious stones and King Solomon responded in kind and gave her “all her desire, whatsoever she asked,” and she left satisfied (1 Kings 10:10). Nearly 3,000 years later, the visit of the Queen of Sheba continues to inspire the creative imagination and has become the subject of many stories that have inspired many artists.

The land of Sheba has been identified as Saba, a nation on the coast of the Red Sea and was part of what are now Eritrea, Somalia, Ethiopia, and Yemen. An Ethiopian account from the 14th-century purports that the Queen of Sheba had sexual relations with King Solomon and gave birth to a son. Ethiopian tradition holds that the son grew up to become King Menelik I, and to found a dynasty that would reign for nearly 3,000 years until Haile Selassie was overthrown in 1974. King Menelik was said to be a practicing Jew who was given a replica of the Ark of the Covenant by King Solomon. Ethiopian tradition states that the original Ark was switched and went to Ethiopia, and is still there, guarded by the Christian Church. The Ethiopian government and church deny all requests to view the alleged ark.

To continue reading this article, please click here.

Inktober Wrap-Up

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Inktober Wrap-Up

A reader requested a post with all 22 of my Inktober drawings. I’m so happy to oblige. I’ve posted these each individually, some with explanatory comments that I won’t repeat here. Click on an image to enlarge and scroll through all.

I’d be interested in knowing which one is your favorite. Please comment below.

 

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