Tag Archives: Diva Challenge

The 100 Day Project Part II

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The 100 Day Project Part II

I’m participating in a few art challenges right now. I joined  The 100 Day Project with the Facebook group, Zentangle All Around. From April 3 to May 31, I spent 15 minutes a day tangling for The Project. Since I don’t always complete a design in 15 minutes, some of mine are spread over multiple days. We post on Instagram. Check out these hashtags: #the100dayproject and #zentangleallaround. Some of my 100 Day Project pieces were done for weekly zentangle challenges as well. My first group of tangles for the 100 Day Project are here.

The last tile in the above-mentioned post was in-progress. Here’s how it looked the next day:

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And here is the completed string, featuring the patterns (top to bottom) Static, Framz, Facets, Storybrooke, and Pooma.

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For the It’s a String Thing challenge #241, featuring patterns Mumsy and Caracole. (By the way, you can click on any smaller image to enlarge it.)

For the Diva Challenge #362, featuring patterns Somnee, Meshmerize, and Atorm:

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For IAST#242 featuring Pixioze, Pots-n-Pans variation, and 4Mom:

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Tangle pattern Gommi:

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For IAST#243, a zenbutton featuring Button, Tonga, and Soul Star:

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For IAST#244, an Auraknot star against a reverse Log Cabin background:

In my sketchbook:

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For DC#364 featuring Puf:

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On June 1 the Daisy Yellow Index-Card-a-Day challenge started. Because I always seem to default to Zentangle, which I love, I’m not getting any practice making illustrations, which is a goal of mine; so I decided my ICAD projects will be animals.

The 100 Day Project continues through July 11, but the ICAD challenge runs until July 31. Also, July is World Watercolor Month, so my July ICADs will all be watercolors.

Installment III of my 100 Day Project offering will be posted on July 7.

What about you? Are you participating in any art challenges? Reply in the comments below. Feel free to include links to where your artwork is posted online (G-rated only, please).

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#DC364 Puf

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Doing triple duty tonight. For The 100 Day Project via Zentangle All Around and the Diva Challenge. The Zentangle pattern Puf can be done a number of ways. Here are a couple of practice tries from my sketchbook:

And here is my tile for the challenge, with Puf done on in square, triangular, and rectangular grids:

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#DC362 Somnee

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The theme for this week’s Diva Challenge is the pattern Somnee, seen extending from the lower left corner below. I also included Zentangle patterns  Meshmerize and Atorm in this string.

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#DC360: Shattuck vs. Tripoli

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#DC360: Shattuck vs. Tripoli

My offering for this week’s Diva Challenge using the two patterns Shattuck and Tripoli. I have an in-progress photo, because I’m participating in The 100 Day Project by tangling for 15 minutes every day (okay, some days) with the Zentangle All Around Facebook group.

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#DC359: String Theory/ Finger Stringer

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This week’s Diva Challenge is to trace your fingers (see my peace sign/V for victory?) and use the outline to create a string to tangle around. I used the patterns Maelstrom, Tofube, and Paradox.

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And because the Zentangle All Around Group is tangling for 15 minutes a day during The 100 Day Project, I have a few in-progress pictures.

#DC357: Paradox

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This week’s Diva Challenge had me practicing for a few days:

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I wondered why paradox is often done in triangular shapes. I’ve had success with using it in a square. Why not other shapes? Pentagons, hexagons, octogons, irregular shapes?

Here’s what I found out (at least in my limited experience):

  • Paradox, made from narrow wedges, looks best when the lines are straight and the points end up where they’re supposed to. Here is where being mindful comes in. Whenever my mind wandered, I was likely to make a skinny rectangle rather than a wedge.
  • I took Laura’s suggestion and turned my tile after every stroke so that I was pulling the pen toward me for better control. I focused on where the vanishing point should be.
  • The larger the shape you’re filling in with paradox, the harder it is to make your lines straight.
  • Paradox also looks better if you can keep the wide part of your wedge consistent.
  • I always make mistakes and think they’re fatal. If I continued to fill in the area instead of quitting, I could barely notice the mess-ups when I was done.

I don’t know how other people plan their monotangles (share in the comments, below, please). At first, I thought I’d just make one large shape:

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But that was really too simple. And, because it was large enough to fill the whole tile, my lines were kind of wobbly.

Next, I thought I’d make three shapes. And then I realized I could fill in areas between them and around them. Here’s what I ended up with:

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I started out with a square in the lower right corner, a pentagon above that, and a hexagon on the left (you can see its swirling voretx). When I filled in around them, the original shapes disappeared, and I was left with chaos!

 

#DC356: What’s in a Name?

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This week’s Diva Challenge is to create a tangle around your name. I used my initials. Patterns: Blossom #04, Fescu, Cadent, Ennies, Printemps, Paradox, and Bumpety Bump.

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I also used a watercolor pen for the first time. Fun!