Tag Archives: Doreen Auger

Interview with Doreen Auger, Master Free-Motion Quilter

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Interview with Doreen Auger, Master Free-Motion Quilter

I discovered Doreen Auger about five years ago when I stumbled on her blog, Treadlemusic. She makes quilts and takes simple vintage household items and turns them into masterpieces with her intricate free-motion quilting.

Free-motion quilting means lowering the feed dogs on your sewing machine so you can manipulate the layers of fabric and batting to accommodate swirling and spiraling and stippling patterns with your stitches. It’s something like riding a bicycle without training wheels—you have a great amount of freedom, but it requires some skill to get positive results. I’m thankful that Doreen agreed to share her expertise and her warm personality with ARHtistic License.

Drunkard’s Path

ARHtistic License: When did you start quilting? How did you learn?

Doreen Auger: I taught myself. Mom wanted to teach me but, being the tom-boy, I wasn’t going to go there! BUT, she had the last word….by giving me/us a sewing machine for a wedding gift. Our 2 boys came along and needed clothes and we had a very tight budget! Enter my determination to learn. That was 53+ years ago!!

Doreen says, “The cute blue and white piece was a client’s piece. It was actually a cardtable/square cloth that had much damage (staining, etc) in the center so I removed a wide strip (from left to right) and pieced it back together, forming the “points” on the right and left edges. I, then, quilted it heavily causing the seaming to disappear. I really loved that little piece.”

AL: You pick up vintage pieces (dresser scarves, pillowcases, quilt tops, etc.) and embellish them with your gorgeous free-motion quilting (also known by the acronym FMQ). What are you on the lookout for, and where do you find them? How do you decide what designs to do?

DA: Those pieces really find me! Friends discover they have these pieces and don’t know what to do with them and I find myself the honored recipient of them. 50’s tablecloths are wonderful to “upcycle” and I use them every day. My quilting ideas come from the piece itself after viewing it while pin-basting and……many ideas come in my dreams! LOL! When I’m really a blank, I doodle in my sketchbook and check out Pinterest.

Front side/Back side

AL: Do you belong to a guild or a quilting group?

DA: I belong to several quilt groups—each with different personalities. One is a “longarmers” group (I’m the only “sit-down” quilter!), one is needlework of all types and the other 2 are quilting—both hand and machine BUT the last 3 groups are primarily “piecers” not “quilters”. I only piece of necessity to get to the part of the process I love!

AL: Do you teach FMQ? Tell me about that. Do you teach certain designs, or how do you structure your lessons? Do you teach at a store, or at events?

DA: I do teach and do trunk shows. The most interest is in the vintage linen quilting. Most have never thought of even doing it. The teaching topics range from very basic beginner to FEATHERS….of course! Everyone wants to do feathers, hmmmm???

Doreen says, “The bunny printed quilt was a thrifted tablecloth to bed quilt that I donated to the Norman, OK, tornado quilt collection for survivors. It was my first vintage piece and first 50s cloth.”

AL: Would you hazard a guess as to how many quilts you’ve made or how many quilts you’ve quilted for others?

DA: I, sadly, am not one to keep track of such things and I do regret it now. Most are/have been given/donated. An example would be, while in Texas last winter (Dec. through the end of April), I made and donated 7 bed-sized quilts. In the course of a year I do, maybe, a dozen large quilts and fill in with the small/medium pieces that utilize the linens.

AL: What kind of quilts do you most like to make?

DA: I like any type….retro, modern, traditional whatever, as long as I can quilt them, I’m happy. The more modern style is a bit of a challenge for me and I enjoy the process of “thinking outside the box”.

Doreen says, “The padded hangers were upcycled using the beautiful embroideries on 2 vintage pillowcases. I give directions for achieving this on my blog here: https://treadlemusic.wordpress.com/2018/01/12/vintage-quilted-covered-hangers-how-to/.”

AL: What is your favorite sewing machine for free-motion quilting, and why?

DA: I have 2 favorites: a Juki 2010Q (domestic with a 9” harp) straight stitch, industrial for home use (meaning it has an internal motor rather than a table mounted type separate from the machine itself) and my Handi Quilter Sweet Sixteen, sit-down mid-arm. LUV them both. The Juki is an incredible piecing machine with a thread cutter and knee operated pressure foot lifter AND awesome for FMQ! I, also, have a Juki in our Winter Texas place.

Enhanced doily.

AL: Tell us about your fabric stash.

DA:Wow! Now, that’s a topic!!! Totes…almost too many to count! Some are sorted by color, by seasonal (winter/Christmas), batiks, special interest (woodworking, hunting, RV) AND, of course, linens!

AL: What are your favorite colors?

DA: Purple……surprise! Just kidding a bit. I love green in all of its varieties of hues and tints. Although I like pastels, it’s the “cozy” feel that most often draws my eye. Reproduction/Americana fabrics seem to have a prominent place in my stash.

Vintage linen embellished with quilting.

AL: What is a project you’re looking forward to starting?

DA: Always the next one. While I’m finishing the binding or label on the current endeavor, my mind is straying to the “what’s next”. Right now, it’s a Christmas gift for our son/DIL. A king size Mariner’s Compass piecing that I did using a Dream Big flower panel for one of the components. This one is proving to be a creative challenge as it’s going to have a more contemporary feel (the outer border is floral so, maybe, a feather or two will appear!!!!).

Doreen says, “The black pillow is an example of a workshop project to help break that “quilter’s block” when it comes to background fill. Randomly cut a large patterned piece of fabric and spraybaste it to a background. Sandwich it and begin to play with designs. Outline what’s there, continuing the design beyond the cut into a thread only motif. Fun. “

AL: What advice would you give to a quilter who is timidly considering free-motion quilting? How would you suggest he or she begin?

DA: I am self-taught in this art, also. Check out some online quilters’ blogs and start looking to see just what it is that intrigues you. Figure out ‘why’ you want to learn this part of the process. Is it because you want the finish to be completely done by you? Is there a creative part of you looking for an outlet? Advice: be realistic when it comes to your personal learning curve. Do NOT be hard on yourself……we all learn differently and at different paces. Make sure your machine is in tip top working order (clean, etc.) and you know how to set it up properly for FMQ. Do you have a FMQ foot? Drop the feed dogs-or not? Get a cheap sketchpad and doodle..lots! Practice 15 minutes a day….every day (rather than big chunks of time sporadically). Make sure your chair is at proper height for your machine (so your elbows are at 90 degree angle when resting on the table. You must have some type of an extension table…..just the free-arm is too narrow of an area. It’s a new journey….even if you have sewn for years….this is different. Your final skill level achieved may not be the same as anyone else…..we are all different. Don’t be so hard on yourself.

Connecting Threads 3-piece table topper.

AL: Do you have any funny quilting stories?

DA: Not really “funny” but, when teaching my workshops (beginner or not), it’s quite fascinating to observe how intensely focused the gals are when stitching and trying to get them to take a break…..well, that’s almost impossible!!!! They’re “sweating bullets” but would prefer to work right through a lunch break!!! I love it!!! And, always, they have a sense of accomplishment at the end of the day.

Vintage tablecloth made even more beautiful with heavy quilting.

AL: You spend the winters in Texas and the warmer months in Minnesota. Where did you grow up? What are the joys and challenges of splitting the year between two different states?

DA: The St. Paul Metro area is where I grew up but we lived in both Minneapolis and St. Paul before buying our little hobby farm in extreme southeast Minnesota, outside the very small town of Houston. It’s been 46 years since that move! Wintering in Texas, for the past 6 years, has been interesting. DH got weary of the snow/cold and we both agreed that Arizona (where all our friends go) and Florida didn’t hold an attraction. Deep South Texas has the beaches (South Padre Island) and the warmth we wanted with the added perk of extremely reasonable living costs (cheapest in the nation!). Now that I have my little sewing nest set up comfortably, it is amazing. There are few quilt shops in the immediate vicinity so I try to plan just how much (and what) of my stash I’ll need to bring down there………trying to remember the limitations imposed by the interior dimensions of our car!!

From a couple of years ago: Doreen with her husband, Tom. Doreen says, “My bike is a ’96 HD Heritage Softail Classic. Tom’s is an HD Road King.”

AL: How long have you been riding a motorcycle? And why?

DA: My love of biking goes back to when I was a late teen. No personal experience but just totally enamored of them. When I met Tom, our 2nd date was a several hundred mile ride to southern MN…mostly spent in rain!!! Over the years, living on our farmlet, bikes & go-carts were the recreation of choice for our boys, Tom and I. Dirt bikes were easy to maneuver and learn on. We began going to the Sturgis Rally, back in the early 90s, with  our club. I realized that, while I was riding behind Tom, if something were to happen and I needed “wheels”, I would need to get my own license. Just before my 50th birthday (in April), I signed up for a motorcycle safety course and got the required license and have been loving it ever since. Now, at 74, I find myself at the quilting more than the biking, though. I still have my Harley.

AL: Is there anything else you’d like readers to know about you or your quilts?

DA: Quilting has changed over the years, as has all art forms. It becomes what the current generation brings to it. The process adapts and is filtered through present life experiences and comes out unique to the present. I consider myself a textile artist who specializes in the FMQ portion of the quilting process. It is a creative outlet that I’m DRIVEN to do and is a significant part of who I am. My creative expression, also, takes form in my piano music. My monthly piano moments at a local hospital is a great blessing to me and, I pray, to those visiting the clinic. Sharing my baking/cooking with family and others makes up another facet. All that I’ve shared has been given to me as an amazing gift from my Lord and Savior for the purpose of sharing with others. Its value is only truly realized when these fabric pieces or music or kitchen sharings, etc., are taken to heart by another in need of a day-brightener.

Doreen Auger

All photographs in this article are the property of Doreen Auger. Used with permission.