Tag Archives: Fairy tales

Meet Author Shonna Slayton

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Shonna-Slayton-headshot-website

Shonna Slayton is a prolific writer of young adult historical fiction and fairytale reimaginings. Her books include Cinderella’s Dress (2014), Cinderella’s Shoes (2015), Liz and Nellie (2016), Spindle (2016), Snow White’s Mirror (2018), The Tower Princess (2018), Beauty’s Rose (2019), Cinderella’s Legacy (2019), Sleeping Beauty’s Spindle (2020), The Little Mermaid’s Voice (2021), Lessons from Grimm: How to Write a Fairy Tale (2020), and its companion volumes, the workbook (2020), the high school workbook (2020), the middle school workbook (2020), the elementary workbook (2020), Prompts from Grimm (Grades 7-12) and Prompts from Grimm (Grades 3-6). I am delighted that she agreed to be interviewed for ARHtistic License–she has so much to share with us.

Cinderella's Dress

ARHtistic License: Many of your books are YA historical novels and/or fairy tale sequels. Where do you get your inspiration?

Shonna Slayton: I’ve long been interested in writing historicals and in particular telling women’s stories. But I also have a bent toward fantasy. Why not combine genres? With fairy tales, the inspiration is already there in the original story, giving me plenty to riff from. Once I’ve picked a fairy tale and paired it with a historical time period, the boundaries are set, and I’m free to imagine how to merge these two ideas.

AL: How long does it take you to finish writing a book? What is your favorite part of writing a book? What is the hardest part of writing a book for you?

SS: Each book is different. My favorite part of writing a book is the part I’m not currently working on (!) At least, that’s what it feels like right now. I’m deep in the weeds of Act 2 right now, pushing toward Act 3 and the words are coming ever so slowly.

Snow White's Mirror

AL: Are you a plotter or pantser?

SS: As much as I would like to be a plotter, I’m more of a discovery writer. I know many of the plot points going in, but not how I’m going to get there. I rely on the characters to make those decisions, but the characters are not fully formed in the first draft…kind of the chicken or the egg scenario. I write in a spiral, moving forward, but often swooping back to earlier chapters to add more information as I learn it.

AL: Your first few novels were published by a publishing house. Did you have an agent? What was your submission process like?

SS: Yes, I was originally published through Entangled Teen. I’ve never had an agent. I went to a writing conference with plans of what classes I was going to take, but when Entangled publisher Liz Pelletier stood up to introduce herself and the sessions she was giving, I changed all my plans and went to her talks. At the time, she was working off of a different publishing model which fascinated me, and I wanted to be in on the experiment. I simply submitted my work directly to her a few days after the conference. She’s a smart business woman, and I was thrilled to work with her company for as long as I did.

Liz and Nellie

AL: Now you mostly self-publish. Sometimes readers assume authors choose to self-publish because they’re not good enough to get a book deal. That’s certainly not true in your case. Why did you decide to abandon traditional publishing?

SS: To be honest, traditional publishing abandoned me. My fourth book got cancelled, and while the company was willing to keep working with me if I changed what I was writing, I wanted to finish what I started.
Fortunately, when self-publishing started to take off, I thought it would be a good idea to have a foot in both publishing models. My first attempt at self-publishing (Liz and Nellie, about Nellie Bly’s race around the world) came out between my second and third traditional book. So, when my contract was cancelled, it wasn’t much of a leap to turn to self-publishing.

Looking back, knowing what I know now, cancelling my book was a smart business decision for Entangled and, it turned out, for me, too. My books didn’t generate enough revenue to keep a publisher’s interest, but when all the royalties come to me, I can make it work. Under a trad publisher, my books would have slowly died, but with the tools available to indie authors (such as paid advertising, newsletters, control over pricing, and a bit of courage to put yourself out there), I can keep a steady stream of readers finding my books.

Lessons from Grimm

AL: What’s up next?

SS: I’m working on an original fairy tale trilogy based on kelpie mythology. While set in a fantasy land, it’s got a Scottish flair.

I’m also in the process of producing audiobooks for my Fairy-tale Inheritance Series. The first audiobook, Cinderella’s Dress is out now. It’s been fun to work with a voice actor to bring the story to life.

AL: It’s been great to hear about your writing and publication journey. Thank you for sharing with us. I’ve read most of your books and enjoyed them immensely.

SS: Thanks for inviting me onto your blog, Andrea! I love how you focus on creativity in a variety of ways here.

In the Meme Time: Dream

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Dream

Creative Juice #143

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Creative Juice #143

Gorgeous ideas to jump-start your imagination.

Monday Morning Wisdom #120

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Monday Morning Wisdom #120

Found on Twitter:MMWgaiman-quote

Guest Post: Four Things Writers Can Learn From Fairy Tales (Besides Never Eat The Free Apple)

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Guest Post: Four Things Writers Can Learn From Fairy Tales (Besides Never Eat The Free Apple)

This article has been reprinted with the permission of Writer’s Relief, a highly recommended author’s submission service. We assist writers with preparing their submissions and researching the best markets. We have a service for every budget, as well as a free e-publication for writers, Submit Write Now! Visit our site today to learn more.

4thingswriterslearnfairytales

Everyone has a favorite fairy tale. Who could resist a story with a winning hero, a dastardly villain, and everything turning out for the best at the end? But fairy tales are more than simple stories with pat conclusions. There are some very good reasons why these bedtime stories are enduring classics. Here are four fundamental elements found in every time-tested fairy tale that can help you create your own unforgettable stories.

Four Fairy-Tale Fundamentals For Writers

A worthy main character. Your main character should rouse the reader’s concern. Consider good-hearted, trusting protagonists like Cinderella and Snow White, who don’t deserve the treachery that is about to befall them; or innocent Hansel and Gretel, abandoned in the woods, tugging at your heartstrings as they try to find their way home. And how could you not feel sorry for the poor little Ugly Duckling? Capture your readers’ sympathy and they’ll be fully invested in the story’s outcome.

Many fairy tales feature characters using clever ways to outwit their adversaries. Thumbelina overcomes the obstacles of her size by finding inventive ways to use objects around her. The shrewd tailors who fashioned the Emperor’s new clothes made something out of nothing (literally!). Readers enjoy identifying with ordinary characters who find extraordinary ways to rise above life’s unexpected hurdles. Tip: A three-dimensional characterwill definitely appeal to readers’ modern tastes!

A fiendish villain. Give readers an antagonist they’ll love to hate. Evil queens may inspire you to write about authority figures who abuse their power. Everyone despises wicked witch characters who put defenseless children in peril. Introduce your own version of a big, bad wolf or a repulsive troll living under the bridge, and put your hero or heroine in imminent danger. A detestable villain and the unbearable suspense he or she creates will keep your readers anxiously turning the pages.

A fantastic setting. Instead of taking place in a typical apartment complex, perhaps your narrative is set in a medieval castle. Your big-city heroine might have more interesting adventures in a forbidden forest. By introducing a unique setting, you can give your story a fresh atmosphere that will pleasantly surprise readers.

An unexpected plot twist. The Ugly Duckling becomes a beautiful swan. The last billy-goat gruff is large enough to easily give the bridge troll his comeuppance. And a princess has a sleepless night on multiple cushy mattresses over a single pea. Having an unanticipated turn of events for your story’s ending will make your writing compelling, interesting, and, ultimately, unforgettable.

Once upon a time, an author wondered how to write a story that would win the hearts of readers. A wise, writerly fairy godmother advised the author to incorporate these four elements found in many timeless fairy tales. The story was well-written, enjoyed by all, and the author became a success. And everyone lived happily ever after!

Photo by PVCG