Tag Archives: Painting

Creative Juice #34

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Creative Juice #34

Thirteen articles to inspire you.

The Quintessential Portrait Painter

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The Quintessential Portrait Painter

John Singer Sargent (January 12, 1856 – April 14, 1925) was born in Florence, Italy to American parents. He had little formal schooling; instead, he learned geography, arithmetic, and reading from his father. He became an accomplished pianist. His mother, an amateur artist, encouraged him to draw, and the family’s travels exposed him to many subjects for his artwork, and also facilitated fluency in Italian, French, and German.

He began his formal art training during the winter of 1873–74 at the Accademia di Belle Arti in Florence. In May, 1874, Sargent entered the teaching atelier of Carolus-Duran, a leading portraitist in Paris, who encouraged his students to paint immediately (rather than make preliminary drawings. Study of the works of Rembrandt, van Dyck and Velázquez also influenced Sargent. But at a time when the art world experimented with Impressionism, Fauvism, and Cubism, Sargent practiced his own form of Realism.

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Madame X (Madame Pierre Gantreau)

He burst into the art scene in 1884 with his painting of Madame Pierre Gautreau. Exhibited as Madame X, people complained that the painting was provocatively erotic, producing scandal for Sargent rather than fame. He decided to flee Paris for London in 1886, living in England for most of the rest of his life, and becoming the “leading portrait painter of his generation” for his depictions of Edwardian era luxury.

Sargent had no assistants; he handled all tasks himself, such as preparing his canvases, varnishing the painting, arranging for photography, shipping, and documentation. He commanded about $5,000 per portrait, or about $130,000 in today’s currency.

After the turn of the century, Sargent grew tired of portrait painting (although he consented to painting portraits of United States Presidents Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson). He acquired commissions for other kinds of work, such as murals for the Boston Public Library, Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts, and the Harry Elkins Widener Memorial Library at Harvard University. He also established a solid reputation as a watercolorist.

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Portrait of Mrs. Cecil Wade

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Portrait of Lady Agnew

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Portrait of John D. Rockefeller

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Portrait of Nancy Viscountess Astor

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Portrait of Lady Helen Vincent

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The Garden Wall

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Bedouins

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The Fountain, Villa Torlonia, Frascati, Italy

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Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose

 

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Dans Les Oliviers

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Street in Venice

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Claude Monet Painting by the Edge of a Wood

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Muddy Alligators

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An Out-of-Doors Study

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The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit

Click here to hear artist Kehinde Wiley’s thoughts on John Singer Sargent.

Information for this article was gathered from:

 

Creative Juice #29

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Creative Juice #29

Fourteen articles, guaranteed to spark lots of creative ideas.

Video of the Week #86: Van Gogh as You’ve Never Seen him Before

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Video of the Week #86: Van Gogh as You’ve Never Seen him Before

Creative Juice #28

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Creative Juice #28

Fifteen articles to ignite the spark.

Creative Juice #23

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Creative Juice #23

Fifteen articles to inspire you in the New Year:

  • Glass miniature masterpieces.
  • These dogs, drawn by Holly Lucero, will give you nightmares.
  • A way to look at your subject so you can draw it more accurately.
  • Skyscrapers into infinity.
  • Please buy me a book illustrated by Tihomir Čelanović. I wish I could read the stories these drawings tell.
  • Breathtaking views of Paris, 1946.
  • I just love Suhita Shirodkar’s work. Take a peek at her sketchbook.
  • Here’s a cool zentangle technique.
  • You can turn a fail around.
  • Tips from people who have been around the block a few times.
  • Woody Guthrie’s New Year resolutions from 1943. I could make a few of these, even though I’m allergic to New Year resolutions.
  • I’m going to try this technique for watercolor backgrounds for zentangle.
  • The large-scale paintings of Salman Khoshroo. Be sure to watch the video of the artist at work. Fascinating.
  • A Christian’s take on creativity and mental illness. Though I’m also a Christian, I don’t believe exactly as she does, but it’s still an interesting essay. Warning: the video is decidedly unholy.
  • I’m thinking of participating in this challenge. How about you? It may help you reach one of your goals for 2017…

Video of the Week #80: Water

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Video of the Week #80: Water

Creative Juice #22

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Creative Juice #22

Twelve articles to make lightbulbs shine above your head.

Creative Juice #21

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Creative Juice #21

It’s hard to be creative with the holidays looming, right? Here are a dozen articles to get you in the mood:

Creative Juice #19

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Creative Juice #19

 

Fourteen recent articles culled from the web to spark your creativity:

  • I love this artist-in-training’s blog. If you like this article, you might want to check out the resources she lists on her blog.
  • Before the reno—art show.
  • I want to live here.
  • Combining music and art.
  • How random shadows inspired a filmmaker to make art.
  • Pretty quilts and other interesting stuff.