Tag Archives: Painting

Creative Juice #41

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Creative Juice #41

A dozen expressions of rampant creativity.

Creative Juice #40

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Creative Juice #40

Twelve sources of inspiration for your creative endeavors:

Creative Juice #39

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Creative Juice #39

Good stuff here this week. Lots of ideas to make you more creative.

  1. The perils of being a new photographer (or how to almost get thrown out of a concert by Prince).
  2. Big Bang Theory star Mayim Bialik has written a new book for girls.
  3. What’s your superpower?
  4. Did you know former president George W. Bush is an artist?
  5. Photos or paintings?
  6. I love keeping up with this quilt group.
  7. What can you do with a dead butterfly?
  8. The illustrations of Pat Achilles.
  9. Interesting reading list.
  10. I may already have included this article in a previous Creative Juice, but it bears rereading—it’s that important for your brain.
  11. Five things you can do now to encourage your creativity.
  12. Another strategy to improve your creativity.

V is for Van Gogh

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V is for Van Gogh

 

 

 

Vincent Willem van Gogh (March 30, 1853–July 29, 1890) was a Dutch Post-Impressionist painter who is among the most famous and influential figures in the history of Western art.

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Van Gogh: The Starry Night

Born into an upper-middle-class family, Vincent was a quiet, serious child who liked to draw.

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Van Gogh: Fishing Boats on the Beach at Saintes-Maries

As a young man, he pursued his interest in art by working as an art dealer. After he was transferred to London, he fell in love with his landlady’s daughter, but his feelings were not returned. He succumbed to depression, and was ultimately released from his firm. (Click on smaller images to enlarge and reveal captions.)

He turned to his faith, and served as a missionary in southern Belgium. After that, he briefly held a series of jobs as a teacher, a minister’s assistant, and a bookstore clerk.

He drifted in ill health and solitude before moving back home with his parents in 1881, where he took up painting. His younger brother Theo supported him financially, and the two maintained a lively correspondence by letter. Vincent’s early works, mostly still lifes and depictions of peasant laborers, contain few signs of the vivid color that distinguished his later work.

In 1886, van Gogh moved to Paris, where he met members of the avant-garde, including Paul Gauguin, whom he greatly admired. Vincent’s paintings grew brighter in color as he developed a style that became fully realized during his stay in Arles in the south of France in 1888. Van Gogh invited Gauguin to join him there and paint together. Their friendship was short-lived, and ended after an argument and a violent confrontation with a razor, when in a rage, Vincent severed part of his own left ear.

Van Gogh suffered from psychotic episodes and delusions. He neglected his physical health, did not eat properly, and drank heavily. His depression continued and on July 27, 1890, Van Gogh shot himself in the chest with a revolver. He died from his injuries two days later. He was only 37 years old.

In just over a decade, van Gogh created about 2,100 artworks, including around 860 oil paintings, most of them in the last two years of his life in France, where he died. They include landscapes, still lifes, portraits and self-portraits, and are characterized by bold colors and dramatic, impulsive and expressive brushwork that contributed to the foundations of modern art. His work was largely unappreciated during his lifetime. Today he is considered a creative genius.

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Van Gogh: Wheatfield with Crows

Most of the information from this article came from Wikipedia.

If you’re on Twitter, you can follow @VanGoghTheLife and see a new Van Gogh painting every day—some of which you’ve undoubtedly never seen before.

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Van Gogh, Starry Night Over the Rhone

Other posts about van Gogh on ARHtistic License:

What about you—do you like van Gogh? What other artists do you like? Share in the comments below.

Creative Juice #35

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Creative Juice #35

Thirteen lucky articles to make you smile and tweak your imagination.

Creative Juice #34

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Creative Juice #34

Thirteen articles to inspire you.

The Quintessential Portrait Painter

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The Quintessential Portrait Painter

John Singer Sargent (January 12, 1856 – April 14, 1925) was born in Florence, Italy to American parents. He had little formal schooling; instead, he learned geography, arithmetic, and reading from his father. He became an accomplished pianist. His mother, an amateur artist, encouraged him to draw, and the family’s travels exposed him to many subjects for his artwork, and also facilitated fluency in Italian, French, and German.

He began his formal art training during the winter of 1873–74 at the Accademia di Belle Arti in Florence. In May, 1874, Sargent entered the teaching atelier of Carolus-Duran, a leading portraitist in Paris, who encouraged his students to paint immediately (rather than make preliminary drawings. Study of the works of Rembrandt, van Dyck and Velázquez also influenced Sargent. But at a time when the art world experimented with Impressionism, Fauvism, and Cubism, Sargent practiced his own form of Realism.

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Madame X (Madame Pierre Gantreau)

He burst into the art scene in 1884 with his painting of Madame Pierre Gautreau. Exhibited as Madame X, people complained that the painting was provocatively erotic, producing scandal for Sargent rather than fame. He decided to flee Paris for London in 1886, living in England for most of the rest of his life, and becoming the “leading portrait painter of his generation” for his depictions of Edwardian era luxury.

Sargent had no assistants; he handled all tasks himself, such as preparing his canvases, varnishing the painting, arranging for photography, shipping, and documentation. He commanded about $5,000 per portrait, or about $130,000 in today’s currency.

After the turn of the century, Sargent grew tired of portrait painting (although he consented to painting portraits of United States Presidents Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson). He acquired commissions for other kinds of work, such as murals for the Boston Public Library, Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts, and the Harry Elkins Widener Memorial Library at Harvard University. He also established a solid reputation as a watercolorist.

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Portrait of Mrs. Cecil Wade

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Portrait of Lady Agnew

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Portrait of John D. Rockefeller

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Portrait of Nancy Viscountess Astor

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Portrait of Lady Helen Vincent

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The Garden Wall

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Bedouins

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The Fountain, Villa Torlonia, Frascati, Italy

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Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose

 

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Dans Les Oliviers

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Street in Venice

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Claude Monet Painting by the Edge of a Wood

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Muddy Alligators

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An Out-of-Doors Study

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The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit

Click here to hear artist Kehinde Wiley’s thoughts on John Singer Sargent.

Information for this article was gathered from:

 

Creative Juice #29

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Creative Juice #29

Fourteen articles, guaranteed to spark lots of creative ideas.

Video of the Week #86: Van Gogh as You’ve Never Seen him Before

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Video of the Week #86: Van Gogh as You’ve Never Seen him Before

Creative Juice #28

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Creative Juice #28

Fifteen articles to ignite the spark.