Tag Archives: Phoenix AZ

Phoenix Art Museum

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Phoenix Art Museum

This past Mother’s Day, my youngest daughter, Katie, spent the afternoon with me at the Phoenix Art Museum. Here is a sampling of what we saw–just a tiny bit of the museum.

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Ballet Dancer by Everett Shinn

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Birdie Serenade by Gregory West

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Detail of above

 

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The Golfer by Victor Vasarely

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Nude Man by Viola Frey, glazed ceramic

When we were on the raised platform where the Nude Man sat, Katie looked across the way and asked about the view below, “Is that a hallway or another piece of art?”

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Answer: it’s a hallway; but do you see why she thought it might be a large mural or something?

Below is the wooden facade from a house in Hue, Vietnam.IMG_0708

Upside Down, Inside Out by Anish Kapoor, sculpture made of resin and paint:

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Below, Column Interminable by Betsabeé Romero: 17 “tires” inscribed with symbols from pre-conquest North, South, and Central America, the Aztecs, the Paracas people of Peru, and the ancient Hohokam people who lived in what is now Arizona. Romero’s themes are migration and borders.

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The portrait below of Philip Glass looks photographic, no? It’s not. Viewed up close, you’d see it’s a jacquard tapestry woven of very fine colored fibers. I’m guessing technology was key in producing this. I can’t imagine it was woven by hand. Phil–State I by Chuck Close:

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Fernando Bryce drew the collection of drawings below from advertisements and newspaper articles about Leni Riefenstahl, the German dancer and actress who directed Nazi propaganda films. His motivation for the work was to explore the tension of an artist working on behalf of an evil dictator.

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Samurai Tree 2H by Gabriel Orozco

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Message by Matthias Goeritz; gold painted perforated metal on painted wood

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Detail of Message

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Hopi Flute Player by Emry Kopta

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Shift Change at the Magma by Lew Davis

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Sphere Lit from the Top by Sol LeWitt

The remaining images are pieces of European art on loan from the Schorr Collection:

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Portrait of Cardinal Domenico Grimani by Lorenzo Lotto

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Portrait of Barbara Palmer by Peter Lely

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Detail of Portrait of Barbara Palmer

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Genoese Nobleman by Antony Van Dyck

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Portrait of a Man, Probably Pieter de Graaf by Govaert Flinck

The following are woodcuts by Albrecht Dürer:

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The Annunciation

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Detail of The Annunciation

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The Adoration of the Magi

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Detail of Adoration of the Magi

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Portrait of Baron Philippe François Didier Usquin by Anne-Louis Girodet de Roucy-Trioson

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Portrait of an Old Woman by Jan Anthonisz. van Ravesteyn

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Bust of Julio Contarini by Alessandro Vittoria

Below, Moses Receiving the Tablets of the Law and Christ Blessing by Benjamin West.

It’s been ten years since I’ve been to the Phoenix Art Museum. I’m so grateful Katie wanted to go with me. Thanks, Katie!

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Walk in the Art District

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Walk in the Art District

On Tuesday nights, on my way home from folk dancing at the Irish Cultural Center, I pass through part of the Phoenix art scene called Roosevelt Row. Many of the buildings have murals painted on them, and I longed to see what they look like in the daylight, so several weeks ago I took a field trip. I’ve already posted photos of the Irish Cultural Center and the nearby Trinity Cathedral.

But let’s back up a little. I took some pictures in front of the quirky FOUND:RE Hotel on Central Avenue next to the Irish Cultural Center:

 

On the corner of Roosevelt and Central stands this monument:

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I realized I’d left my water bottle in the car when I boarded the light rail, so I stopped at a doughnut shop for an iced green tea.

Here’s what the building looks like from the side:

 

Pretty flowers, right? Lots of nice plantings in Phoenix.

A little further on is a restaurant called Carly’s Bistro, which I like because my oldest daughter’s name is Carly. The walls all around are covered with murals.

 

Did I mention murals are common on Roosevelt Row?

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This mural appears on the fellowship hall of the church below.

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The Stella Artois people set up an “Art of the Chalice” event.

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Pretty tour bus:

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The back of an Art Gallery called First Studio:

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Characters from a local children’s television show that ran from 1954 to 1989, Wallace and Ladmo. My daughter Carly attended a taping, but did not score a coveted Ladmo bag.

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This historic post office now “belongs” to Arizona State University.

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I barely scratched the art district. I’ll have to go back and take more photos. Next time, maybe I’ll visit some of the galleries.

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Trinity Cathedral, Phoenix

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Trinity  Cathedral, Phoenix

Near the center of Phoenix, at the border of the art district, Trinity Cathedral rises like an  oasis.

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Situated around a central courtyard, the buildings enclose a labyrinth and a sculpture garden recalling Christ’s passion and the saints. Conveniently placed benches allow visitors a place to pray and reflect in peaceful surroundings. The current sanctuary opened for worship on Christmas Day, 1920.

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Another building bears a plaque which reads Bishop Atwood House Erected 1930.

A beautiful leaded glass door serves as the portal into the cathedral.

The Irish Cultural Center, Phoenix, Arizona

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The Irish Cultural Center, Phoenix, Arizona

Right in the center of bustling, modern Phoenix rises a complex of stone structures reminiscent of medieval times.

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Pass through the gates and you realize you’re somewhere magical.

The Irish Cultural Center is many things: a monument to a people devastated by famine; a place where Irish-Americans can research their roots; an academy where you can learn to play harp or bodhran, speak Gaelic, or dance Irish and Scottish dances; home to a rare facsimile of the Book of Kells; a library housing collections of Irish literature and history. It is also where the Phoenix International Folk Dancers meet every Tuesday night, in the building pictured below.

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By far the largest building is the McClelland Library.

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The Visitor’s Center looks like a quaint Irish cottage. It also contains a gift shop.

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Though the buildings look hundreds of years old, they were constructed after 2000.

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And here is a monument commemorating  the deaths of 1,500,000 people during the Great Hunger of 1845-1850:IMG_0605IMG_0607IMG_0606

For more information about the Irish Cultural Center, see their website.

Art Reflections

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Art Reflections

My offerings for the Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge.

My daughter Katie honored me today (Mother’s Day) by accompanying me to the Phoenix Art Museum. (More photos from our visit will appear in a future post.) I captured our reflections in two of the sculptures.

In front of Upside Down, Inside Out by Anish Kapoor:

Nine Slat Mirror by Thomas Glassford:

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Z is for Zoo

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Z is for Zoo

When my brother Bill visited from New Jersey last month, one of the places I took him was the Phoenix Zoo. Here are some highlights:

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Zebra

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Flamingos

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Monkey

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What’s on the little island? Storks?

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Pelicans

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Orangutan family

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An ibis, I think

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I pleaded with this peacock to spread his tail, but he would not cooperate. 

My camera battery conked out before we saw the giraffes, one of my favorite animals at the zoo.
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Arizona Fine Art Expo

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Arizona Fine Art Expo

If you are in the greater Phoenix metropolitan area any time between now and April 3, 2016, be sure to visit the Arizona Fine Art Expo.

In North Scottsdale on the west side of Scottsdale Road just south of Jomax, set up near MacDonalds Ranch are 44,000 square feet of tents sheltering exhibits of the work of 120 artists. Passes for the duration of the show are $10 ($8 for military and ages 55+). The Expo is open from 10 AM to 6 PM. Plan to go back for multiple visits. I began to get museum overload after three hours. You can’t see everything in one trip.

 

And if you are in the market for one or more large statement pieces for your home or business, this is the place you’ll find it.

Mind you, this is not a craft show; this is juried fine art (translation: prices range well into the thousands of dollars). The work is by established artists, many of whom have decades of experience. Most come from Arizona and surrounding states; others from as far away as Texas, South Dakota, Wyoming, Montana, Kansas, Iowa, and Minnesota. Some of the artists are actually producing work at the Expo, and most are happy to talk about their creative process. Many make custom artwork.

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Sculptor Richard Tucker with a horse-in-progress

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More by Carol Schinkel

What is noteworthy about this show is its diversity. From painting, photography, and sculpture to ceramics, furniture, and less-easily categorized pieces. Lots of Western art, as you would expect from the origins of the artists, but also every style—realistic, abstract, impressionist, folk, cartoonish, and uniquely original.

In an outdoor space surrounded by the tents, there is a garden where some of the larger sculptures are located, along with seating and tables for lunch or a quick snack. There is even a cafe.

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by Richard Tucker

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by Richard Tucker

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Abstract Bird by Tendai Gwaravaza (cobalt)

Here is a lovely writing table by John Montoya:

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Note the stone inlay:

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This credenza is a joint project between John and his wife Betsy Montoya, who painted the colorful buffalo panel.

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And this console table is covered in cow hide

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and has inlay on the top.

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The photographic images below are by Lee Hendrickson. Watch ARHtistic License for an article about him on March 22, 2016.

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The map below is by Janelle Lindley. Come back to ARHtistic License on April 19, 2016 for an article about her process.

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Some of Ed Caldie‘s artwork hints at another of his passions.

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A pianist, he said, “I wish I could make a visual representation of what I hear when I listen to music.” I think he did a pretty good job with Rhapsody. Musicians would understand this:

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And one more, Arpeggio:

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David Garrison spends part of his year painting in France. Is it just me, or do you see a little Degas influence in his work:

And more:

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Honestly, you can almost feel the spray off the waterfall.

 

Scott Woodward works in sculpture and mixed media. He loves intense color.

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Scott L. Wallis paints lush landscapes and florals.

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Paula Yates does life-like bronze sculpture:DSC00964DSC00965

Bob Coonts‘ love of animals and color shows in his work:

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It is said that after Beethoven lost his hearing, he took the legs off his piano, the better to feel the vibrations through the floor. Here is sculptor Phillip Payne‘s rendering of Beethoven: Feeling the Music:

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I hope to go back to the Arizona Fine Art Expo at least once more before it closes, and take some more photographs to share. In the meantime, though, go, if you can. It’s a feast for the eyes. And maybe you can even buy something to enjoy in your own home.