Tag Archives: Publishing

Guest Post: Using Amazon Categories to Sell More Books by Peggy Sansevieri

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Guest Post: Using Amazon Categories to Sell More Books by Peggy Sansevieri

Thank you to Peggy Sansevieri for this fascinating book marketing article which previously appeared on Writers in the Storm.

By now most authors know the importance of choosing great keywords on Amazon, but Amazon’s categories are equally important. Choosing the right categories can boost your exposure. And exposure drives book sales.

So, while it’s good to spend a lot of time focusing on keywords, you should also focus on finding narrow categories on Amazon. The reason to look narrow is this: categories with fewer books have lower competition for the #1 spot. And the top ten is a great place to hit, not only because it creates more visibility for your book, but Amazon’s algorithms kick in as you start to spike within categories.

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The BIG Secret about Amazon Categories

When speaking to a contact at Amazon recently, she told me they had rolled out ten categories for each book. Which means that instead of just two categories, you can have up to ten for each of your titles. Why is this good? Well, the more categories your book has, the more places it will show up. And because you have more flexibility now, you can pick some super niche categories, along with less niche ones. This is especially good in markets where there aren’t a ton of niches. Business books often sit in this segment. Having more categories levels the playing field a bit more.

How to Choose the Right Categories

First, when I talk about Amazon categories (and in previous posts I’ve done for this blog), you’ve probably noticed that I always refer to the eBook side of Amazon. This is because the categories on the eBook side are more creative because there are more of them.

To continue reading this article, click here.

Book Submission Roundup

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Book Submission Roundup

Your baby has gone through several drafts and multiple revisions. You’ve had trusted readers pore through it and you’ve applied all their best suggestions. You’re confident your book is ready to go to print. What next? These sixeen articles will help you find a home for your book.

photo-by-bill-ward

Photo by Bill Ward

Scouting Out Kindle Scout

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Scouting Out Kindle Scout

Have you ever wished you could be a first reader for a publisher? Maybe even be instrumental in getting a new book published?

Or have you written a book that you’re thinking of self-publishing, but you really wish you could have some kind of an advance instead of shouldering all the expense of doing it yourself?

On October 14, 2014, Amazon launched Kindle Scout, sort of a crowd-scourced publishing program.

Found on kindlescout.amazon.com

Found on kindlescout.amazon.com

What’s in it for authors?

Kindle scout is open to U.S. authors of romance, mystery, thriller, science fiction, fantasy, literary fiction, action/adventure, contemporary fiction, and historical novels. Submissions are bound by a 45-day exclusivity period with Kindle. Within two days of receipt, Amazon will notify the author if the book is approved to participate.

Then a date is determined for a campaign launch, which lasts 30 days. During that period, anyone can read an excerpt (about 5,000 words) on the Kindle Scout website and “nominate” it. At the end of the campaign period, the books with the most nominations earn the attention of the Kindle Scout team and possibly receive a 5-year Kindle Press contract at 50% royalty with a $1500 advance.

What’s in it for readers?

I’ve read several of the excerpts on the Kindle Scout website and nominated some of them. At any given time, you can have three active nominations; as their campaigns end, they are removed from your Kindle Scout account to make room for more recommendations (or if you find some that are even more deserving, you can delete them yourself and replace with your new choices). And if a book that you nominate is chosen for publication, you get a free advance copy. Plus, there’s the additional satisfaction of helping an excellent author attain the goal of publication.

What are other people saying about Kindle Scout, pro and con?

Here are four excellent articles. Click on the titles to read Scouting Kindle Scout, Kindle Scout: What’s in it for Authors?, Kindle Scout—A Survivors Report, and Should You Kindle Scout?

What do you think?

Is this a good direction for publishing? Could print publishing adopt this model? Have you submitted to Kindle Scout? Would you attempt to go this route? Would you participate from the reader’s end? Please share your comments below.