Guest Post: Top 10 Success Tips from Neil Gaiman by Jenny Hanson

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Guest Post: Top 10 Success Tips from Neil Gaiman by Jenny Hanson

Thank you to Jenny Hanson and Writers in the Storm for these wonderful tips from the incomparable Neil Gaiman.

Over the last few months, I’ve shared “Top 10” lists from J.K. Rowling and Stephen King on the topics of writing and success. This month I chose Neil Gaiman, because he has so much compassion and practical wisdom to share about writing.

The amazing thing to me in compiling these lists is that all three writers offer different advice. The same way three creatives will take a single photograph and create three different worlds, these writers define words like “perseverance” in different ways. It fascinates me.

Here is Gaiman’s “Top Ten” list for writing success:Neil Gaiman

1. Make good art.

The world needs us to do what we do. They need us to create stories that resonate, that take them outside of themselves. If you have the ability to create, take the time to do it well. Elizabeth Gilbert talks about the magic of creativity in Big Magic.

While the fate of the world does not rest upon art, art can reflect the state of the world and it’s fate. It’s a mirror into society’s soul and a great use of your time. Never doubt it.

As Gaiman says, “Do what only you can do, and do your best: Make. Good. Art.

2. Do what you care about.

We spend months and years writing our books. That’s a lot of time to spend with characters and ideas. If you don’t care about your story, what is the point? If you don’t care about your characters, why should your reader?

3. Do new things.

Study after study says the key to creativity is play. If you’ve ever watched children play with each other’s toys, you will see that they love learning how to use their tried and true whatever-toy-it-is in a new way, based on the improvisation of their friends. They have rules and they trust in them. We need trust, both to play and be creative. Exploration, building and thinking with your hands, and role-play where acting it out lets you really get inside it.

Nurture this on the page, and in your critique groups. Look at your old story in a new way. Take a writing class. I just took a Donald Maass class through the Women’s Fiction Writers Association that knocked my socks off – just taking the class made me look at my work in a different way.

4. Ignore the rules.

Gaiman isn’t talking about ignoring a rule “just because.” We’re not tweens, we’re creatives. If a rule kills your writing mojo, it’s okay to ignore it to bring your art into being. His argument: If you know the rules of what is possible, that is what you will do. Often that is ALL you will do. If you don’t know the rules, you will have no idea that you can’t do something. That soul-killing word shouldn’t won’t rear it’s ugly head. You will try. And often you will fly.

Entertainment tip: Anne R. Allen wrote a great post on “secret writing rules” and why we can ignore them.

elements of fiction

Photo by Startup Stock Photos on Pexels.com

5. You are unique.

Your favorite authors have let their inner writing freaks fly free. You can hear their distinctive voices in every book they write. Have you every picked up a Darynda Jones book? Ditto with Christopher Moore and Janet Evanovich?

My friend Natalie Hartford‘s first tagline was, “Be yourself…everyone else is taken.” That is never more true than when you are writing. No one else will tell a story like you, and the people who love your voice will follow you through just about any story you write.

When you allow your uniqueness to shine, your writing will too.

To continue reading this article, click here.

About Andrea R Huelsenbeck

Andrea R Huelsenbeck is a wife, a mother of five and a former elementary general music teacher. A freelance writer in the 1990s, her nonfiction articles and book reviews appeared in Raising Arizona Kids, Christian Library Journal, and other publications. She is currently working on a young adult mystical fantasy novel and a mystery.

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