My Surgery is Making Me Cut Back…

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New posts will appear below this one for a while.

If you’re a regular reader, you may have caught on that surgery is imminent for me. I’m having hip replacement surgery today.

For months, as the pain has increased, my productivity has tanked. When you’re in pain, simple tasks, like grocery shopping or making the bed, become huge undertakings, taking much longer than it should.

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I’ve been struggling to keep up with my blog. Frankly, it is apparent I can not keep up with my daily pace.

So I’m letting myself off the hook.

I’m not worrying about the month of July at all.

I already have posts scheduled for all the Sundays, Mondays, and Thursdays in July, so you’ll still be able to get your weekly From the Creator’s Heart, Monday Morning Wisdom, Video of the Week, and guest post. (They will show up below this post.)  I’m just not up to hustling the original content: the Tuesday/Saturday articles, the Wordless Wednesday photos, the Friday memes. So, they’re gone for a while.

Once I’m off pain meds, I’ll start writing again, but I’ll concentrate on August and beyond (and my book projects).

So, please, bear with me. And send up a prayer to the Great Physician that my healing will be fast. Thanks!

Monday Morning Wisdom #163

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Monday Morning Wisdom #163

Hemingway quote

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From the Creator’s Heart #159

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Image 5-27-18 at 12.52 PM

Guest Post: “Pygmalion and Galatea” by Jean-Léon Gérôme from The Joy of Museums

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Thank you to The Joy of Museums for this guest article about Pygmalion and Galatea. What happens when a sculptor falls in love with his work?

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Pygmalion and Galatea by Jean-Léon Gérôme

“Pygmalion and Galatea” by Jean-Léon Gérôme features the story from Ovid’s Metamorphoses, where the sculptor Pygmalion kisses his ivory statue Galatea, after the goddess, Aphrodite has brought her to life. In Ovid’s narrative, Pygmalion was a Cypriot sculptor who carved a woman out of ivory. Galatea  “she who is milk-white” is the name of the statue carved by Pygmalion. His figure was so beautiful and realistic that he fell in love with it. On Aphrodite’s festival day, Pygmalion made offerings at the altar of Aphrodite, and he made a wish. When he returned home, he kissed his ivory statue and found that its lips felt warm. Aphrodite had granted Pygmalion’s request; the ivory sculpture changed to a woman with Aphrodite’s (or Venus’ the Roman equivalent) blessing.

Jean-Léon Gérôme was a French painter and sculptor, and his oeuvre included historical paintings, Greek mythology, Orientalism and portraits in the academic painting tradition. In 1891 Gérôme made a marble sculpture of Pygmalion and Galatea, based on a plaster version he used as a model for the painting. He made several alternative versions of this painting, each presenting the subject from a different angle.

Reflections

  • Have you seen sculpture so lifelike that it seemed about to move?
  • Is the Pinocchio story a variant of this theme?
  • Is Shaw’s play Pygmalion a modern variant of the myth with a subtle hint of feminism?
  • The Pygmalion story has been the subject of notable paintings and poems. Which is your favourite?

Pygmalion and Galatea

  • Title:                    Pygmalion and Galatea
  • Artist:                  Jean-Léon Gérôme
  • Year:                    1890
  • Type:                   Oil on canvas
  • Dimensions:      35 x 27 in. (88.9 x 68.6 cm)
  • Museum:            Metropolitan Museum of Art – MET

Jean-Léon Gérôme

  • Artist:                Jean-Léon Gérôme
  • Born:                 1824 – Vesoul, Haute-Saône, France
  • Died:                  1904 (aged 79) – Paris, France
  • Nationality:      French
  • Movement:       Academicism, Orientalism
  • Notable works:

~~~

“I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free.” Michelangelo

~~~

Video of the Week #157: 90-Year-Old Figure Skater

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Does regular patterned physical activity keep your brain younger and more resilient? Find something active you like to do, and indulge several times a week. Do it for quality of life, now and in your advancing years.

The 100 Day Project, Part III

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The 100 Day Project, Part III

Hi, everyone. I’m one week post-surgery and doing well. I said I wouldn’t worry about writing any articles during July, but there’s no harm in showing you what I’ve been doing on my art challenge, The 100 Day Project, since the last time I checked in.

The 2018 100 Day Project runs from April 3 through tomorrow. The idea is to make a piece of art every day for 100 days (a tiny artwork is fine). The challenge just happens to overlap with two other challenges I like to do, the Daisy Yellow Index-Card-a-Day challenge and World Watercolor Month.

My theme for ICAD (Index-Card-a-Month) is animals.

By the way, I’ve missed a lot of days, but I expected I would. When you have surgery, all bets are off.


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Lightning bug.

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Zebra.

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Squirrel.

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Fox.

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Flamingo with zentangle.

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There may have been a superhero prompt. This is Underdog.

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Angelfish.

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Mantis.

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Heron.

Now we cross over to watercolor. I am painting on watercolor postcards because index cards are too unpredictable when they get wet. (See mantis above.)

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Butterflyfish.

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Ladybug on daisy.

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This one was inspired by a Williams-Sonoma pillow.

Are you participating in any art challenges right now? Feel free to add a link in the comments.

If you liked this post, make my day by clicking the “Like” button and sharing this article on all your social media. Thanks!

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Monday Morning Wisdom #162

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Monday Morning Wisdom #162

The creative process is a process of surrender, not control. Mystery is at the heart of creativity. That, and surprise. ~Julia Cameron

From the Creator’s Heart #158

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Image 5-20-18 at 4.04 PM