Video of the Day: U is for Unicorn in Captivity

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Video of the Day: U is for Unicorn in Captivity

Share my obsession.

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Monday Morning Wisdom #99: T is for Tchaikovsky

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Monday Morning Wisdom #99: T is for Tchaikovsky

“There is no doubt that even the greatest musical geniuses have sometimes worked without inspiration. This guest (inspiration) does not always respond to the first invitation. We must always work, and a self-respecting artist must not fold his MMWhands on the pretext that he is not in the mood. If we wait for the mood, without endeavouring to meet it half-way, we easily become indolent and apathetic. We must be patient, and believe that inspiration will come to those who can master their disinclination.”
― Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Tchaikovsky

Portrait of Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky by Nikolai Kuznetsov

 

From the Creator’s Heart #95

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From the Creator’s Heart #95

However, as it is written:

“No eye has seen,
no ear has heard,
no mind conceived
what God has prepared for those who love him”—(1 Corinthians 2: 9 NIV)

Weekend Writing Warriors: Snippet #51

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Weekend Writing Warriors: Snippet #51

Every Sunday, the Weekend Writing Warriors share 8-10-sentence snippets from their works-in-progress on their blogs for others to read and comment on. Join the fun! Click on the link to see the full list.

The Unicornologist ~ High school freshman Hillary Noone, on a field trip to The Cloisters, receives a prophecy: she is destined to save the unicorn. Though she shrugs it off as being preposterous, soon life imitates art, and she finds herself in mortal danger.

We’re moving forward several hours from the last snippet. Dave and Beth caught Hillary and tied her to a tree so they could capture Bob (the unicorn) without having to fight her off. When Hillary finally extricates herself from her bonds, she hears a commotion and finds them preparing to saw off Bob’s horn (the alicorn).

The man caught Bob in a neck hold and reached for his horn. He let go as soon as he touched it, apparently startled by its pulsation. Then he resolutely grasped it again and nodded to his companion. The woman had a hacksaw and moved it toward the alicorn. She practiced a sawing motion and moved closer still.

“Stop!” shouted Hillary.

“Go ahead! Do it now! Saw it off!” yelled the man.

The woman tried, but with a mighty lurch of his head, Bob deflected her and threw the man into the air.wewriwa2

I know it’s short (the limit is ten sentences), but what do you think of this small excerpt from Chapter 24? Any suggestions on how I can make it better? Please comment below.

 

S is for Stradivari

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S is for Stradivari

Antonio Stradivari (1644—December 18, 1737) was an Italian luthier, a crafter of string instruments. He is considered the greatest artisan in this field. The Latinized form of his surname, Stradivarius, as well as the colloquial “Strad” are terms often used to refer to his instruments. Scholars estimate that Antonio produced 1,116 instruments, of which 960 were violins. It is estimated that around 650 of these instruments survive.

Stradivari

Antonio Stradivari by Edgar Bundy

It is believed that Stradivari was a student of Nicola Amati, apprenticed from 1656–58, and produced his first decent instruments in 1660, at the age of 16. His first labels were printed from 1660 to 1665, indicating that his work had sufficient quality to be offered directly to his patrons. However, he stayed in Amati’s workshop until about 1684, using his master’s reputation as a launching point for his career.

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Cremona, Italy, where Stradivari was born.

In the early 1690s, Stradivari made a pronounced departure from his earlier style of instrument-making, changing two key elements of his instruments. First, he began to make violins with a larger pattern than previous instruments; these larger violins usually are known as “Long Strads”. He also switched to using a darker, richer varnish, as opposed to a yellower varnish similar to that used by Amati. He continued to use this pattern until 1698, with few exceptions. After 1698, he abandoned the Long Strad model and returned to a slightly shorter model, which he used until his death. The period from 1700 until the 1720s is often termed the “golden period” of his production. Instruments made during this time are usually considered of a higher quality than his earlier instruments.

Husky 214px-Stradivarius_violin_front

Stradivarius violin, photo by Husky

Stradivari’s instruments are regarded as amongst the finest bowed stringed instruments ever created, are highly prized, and are still played by professionals today.

Click here to listen to videos of world-class performers, such as Anne-Sophie Mutter, Itzhak Perlman, Joshua Bell, and Yo Yo Ma, playing Stradivarius instruments.

The Vienna Philharmonic uses several Stradivari instruments that were purchased by the National Bank of Austria and other sponsors.

Information for this article came from Wikipedia.

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Creative Juice #38

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Creative Juice #38

Nine articles, mostly art-related.

In the Meme Time: R is for Reading

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In the Meme Time: R is for Reading

a2z-badge-100-2017Live in that World

Words have Lives

I-have-always-imagined-that-Paradise-will-be-a-kind-of-library

Read 1

Library-quote-by-Anne-Herbert

One-must-be-always-careful-of-books-540x702

Read 2

REad Snicket

Read 3

Reality-that-annoying-time-when-you-are-not-reading-540x303

Read 4

REad Doctor-Who

Read 5

Reading-changes-us-risa-rodil

Future-booklover

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Video of the Week #94: Q is for Quilting

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Video of the Week #94: Q is for Quilting

Wordless Wednesday: P is for Prickly

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Wordless Wednesday: P is for Prickly

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TUESDAYS OF TEXTURE | WEEK 16 OF 2017

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TUESDAYS OF TEXTURE | WEEK 16 OF 2017

My submissions for this week’s Tuesdays of Texture challenge:IMG_0047IMG_0088IMG_0117