In the Meme Time: Q is for Quiet

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Quiet

AtoZ2019tenthAnn

Guest Post: “The Last Supper” by Ugolino di Nerio from Joy of Museums

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Thank you to Joy of Museums for this insightful discussion of The Last Supper.

1024px-1г_Ugolino_di_Nerio._The_Last_Supper_Metropolitan_mus._N-Y“The Last Supper” by Ugolino di Nerio

“The Last Supper” by Ugolino di Nerio shows the scene of the Last Supper of Jesus with his apostles, as it is told in the Gospel of John. This painting formed part of the predella, which is the lowermost horizontal part, of a dismembered altarpiece. In this scene, Christ, on the left, informs his disciples that one of them will betray him, a prophecy that was fulfilled by Judas, who is positioned at Christ’s right without a halo. In this painting, we can also see how Ugolino explored how to paint perspective as seen with the ceiling and the table settings. Leonardo da Vinci was born over 100 years after this painting was made in Florence.

To continue reading this article, click here.

Video of the Week #179: P is for Project Backboard

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AtoZ2019tenthAnn

Wordless Wednesday: O is for Olive Tree

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AtoZ2019tenthAnn

NaPoWriMo2019 #16

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The Removal of Wrinkles

The process requires a heat source with a handle.
Also, a flat surface.
And the item from which the wrinkles will be removed. (In my experience, this is most often a man’s garment, one which usually covers the upper body.)
You will remove the wrinkles from one section of the item at a time.
Place the item on the flat surface with the section located optimally.
Be sure to smooth the section with your hands before you apply the heat source.
Gently glide the heat source across the section, guiding the heat source with the handle.
When the section is free of wrinkles, reposition the item
so that the next section is optimally located on the surface.
Repeat the steps of the process: position, smooth, and glide
until the entire item is devoid of wrinkles.

©ARHuelsenbeck

iron and ironing board; how to iron a shirt

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N is for North Mountain Park

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N is for North Mountain Park

A couple of weeks ago, I received an email:

Hi Andrea,
It’s me, Textile Ranger!  I am going to be in Phoenix the first part of next week, April 8 and 9, staying by North Mountain State Park.  I have stayed there before a few years ago, so you when you wrote about hiking at South Mountain, that registered with me.  It may be very far from your part of Phoenix to where I will be, but I just wanted to check with you about possibly meeting for lunch or an art museum visit or something on one of those days.  If you can’t make it, that is fine, but I didn’t want to come to Phoenix without mentioning it to you.
If you don’t know, Textile Ranger is the blogger behind Deep in the Heart of Textiles. I can’t remember how I stumbled across it, but I love it for the quilts Textile Ranger creates. She’s interested in (and writes about) everything textile, from fibers and dyes to antique clothing. She’s been weaving for decades. (She also has a nature blog, Little Wild Streak.) So, she’s something of a celebrity to me, and I jumped at the chance to meet her in person. And since I’ve been meaning to check out North Mountain Park, I suggested we hike there together before going out to lunch.
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We met last Tuesday at the Visitor Center. She gifted me with a nifty water bottle holder that clips on nicely to the shoulder bag I usually carry when I’m hiking. Now I have a free hand!
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Textile Ranger

And off we went. Ranger (she spent two summers as a park ranger at Big Bend) suggested a 2 1/2 mile trail that didn’t have any steep elevations. Perfect for walking and talking.
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The huge park has breathtaking desert and mountain views. We had some good rains a few weeks ago, and we’ve been rewarded with lovely wildflowers.
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Globemallow below:
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I want to call these buttercups, but I’m not sure that’s what they are:
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These flowers remind me of how little children draw flowers, just circles on a stem; I don’t know what they are–
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But there was an area that was literally blanketed with them:
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And the palo verde trees are just beginning to bloom:
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Closeup of a pale verde blossom:
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And the cholla cactus has these beautiful magenta blooms:
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Back at the visitor’s center, there is a water fountain that dispenses chilled water. Heavenly! And there are beautiful plantings by the building. Don’t know what this bush is:
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I think this is a pink globemallow:
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Cool sculptures:
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Which are the perfect backdrop for another picture of the Textile Ranger:
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I am so thrilled that Textile Ranger is not just a virtual friend any more, but a real friend whom I know face to face. We have lots in common. She’s also a former elementary school teacher, and she loves to read. I’m so touched that she reached out to me. Be sure to check out her blogs, Deep in the Heart of  Textiles and Little Wild StreakShe’s going to post her take on North Mountain Park on Little Wild Streak today.
North Mountain Park is a place I will explore in more detail in the future.
AtoZ2019tenthAnn

Monday Morning Wisdom #204: M is for Michelangelo

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Monday Morning Wisdom #204: M is for Michelangelo

MMWThe greatest danger for most of us is not that our aim is too high and we miss it, but that it is too low and we reach it.  ~ Michelangelo