Flower of the Day: Roses

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Flower of the Day: Roses

For Cee’s Flower of the Day challenge–these voluptuous roses I saw yesterday.

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©ARHuelsenbeck

R.I.P., Gene Wilder

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R.I.P., Gene Wilder

Gene Wilder (Blazing Saddles, Young Frankenstein) passed away this morning.

Found on BrainyQuote:

I like writing books. I’d rather be at home with my wife. I can write, take a break, come out, have a glass of tea, give my wife a kiss, and go back in and write some more. It’s not so bad. I am really lucky. ~Gene Wilder

Photo of Gene Wilder by Caroline Bonarde Ucci

Monday Morning Wisdom #65

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Monday Morning Wisdom #65

Found on TwitterGolub

From the Creator’s Heart #61

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From the Creator’s Heart #61

Come, let us sing for joy to the Lord; let us shout aloud to the Rock of our salvation. Let us come before him with thanksgiving and extol him with music and song (Psalm 95: 1-2 NIV).

A Snippet of The Unicornologist, Chapter 13

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A Snippet of The Unicornologist, Chapter 13

It’s time for Weekend Writing Warriors! Every Sunday, a bunch of writers post 8-10-sentence snippets from their works-in-progress on their blogs. There’s a lot of reading, commenting and great writing. Click on the link to see the full list.

Hillary found some of her mother’s needlepoints in a box in the basement. Missing her deceased mother, and wanting to connect to her somehow, she decides to create a needlepoint picture of a unicorn.

Hillary compared the instructions in her library book to the sample of her mother’s work. The stitches crossed over intersections of the horizontal and vertical threads of the canvas, tilting from lower left to upper right. On the backside they were mostly straight. Knots were forbidden; tails of yarn had to be anchored under stitches on the backside.

She marked the center point on her graph, then basted a thread down the middle of her canvas vertically and horizontally. The threads met at the center of the canvas, and that corresponded to the center of the graph. Surprising Hillary, the book recommended starting the design in the center and working out to the edges. This seemed counterintuitive—wasn’t it logical to start in the upper left corner? Oh, well; she would follow the wisdom of generations’ worth of experience.

In the beginning, progress was slow–several hours’ work yielded only a few lines of pattern.

I know it’s short (the limit is ten sentences), but what do you think of this small excerpt from Chapter 13? I’m hoping it will resonate with anyone who’s done needlepoint or counted cross stitch. Any suggestions on how I can make it better? Please leave your comments below.

 

Inspiration Roundup

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Inspiration Roundup

I confess—I spend a lot of time reading online. Because I blog, I like to see what other people are writing on their blogs. I also research topics that might be useful for an article or for background in a novel, which lead me down all sorts of interesting rabbit holes.

Whenever I come across a posting that particularly appeals to me, a save a link, with the intention of revisiting it. And periodically, I go through my links and reread article after article.browsing-15824_1280 from pixabay

Some are just too good to keep to myself; so I’m going to share some today that I found especially inspiring:

That’s enough for this time. I’ll share more another day.

Thanks to all the writers who originally posted these articles—I’m deeply blessed by your efforts.

Creative Juice #4

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Creative Juice #4

For your reading pleasure and inspiration:

Michelangelo's David by Steve Hanna

Photo by Steve Hanna

In the Meme Time: Got Appeal?

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In the Meme Time: Got Appeal?

Found on Google+:

Text appeal

EASY AND FUN WATERCOLOR FLOWER DOODLES…by Marcia Beckett

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EASY AND FUN WATERCOLOR FLOWER DOODLES…by Marcia Beckett

Marcia BeckettMany thanks to today’s guest blogger, Marcia Beckett. An elementary art specialist who teaches at a school for gifted children, Beckett shares her love of color and whimsy on her blog.

This is a tutorial I recently posted on my other blog Art is Basic, which is all about teaching art to kids. I thought readers here might like it as well.

Easy and Fun Watercolor Doodles with Flowers
I hope you are having a good summer. I have spent some time doodling with watercolors, my favorite artsy thing to do. Today I am going to show you how I transform puddles of watercolor to flower doodles. Here is an example of a finished watercolor flower doodle.
detail flower shot up close
This step-by-step is fun, summery art project for you or your kids to try. I like to share what is fun and exciting for me, because maybe you will take something from it and create your own spin on the idea. Here’s what you need:

Step 1: Dip your brush in water and create a small puddle of water on your paper. Dip your brush in a color from your watercolor palette. Touch the puddle with the color and watch the colors spread. watercolor circles close up
Drop in additional colors to create different effects.
Watercolor dots

Fill a whole page with the watercolor blobs.
watercolor dots
watercolor dots
Step 2: Allow your watercolor puddles to dry. Use permanent black marker to outline the puddles. Or, you can draw flowers right on top, radiating from the center of the petal.

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Watercolor Flowers Step 2 (617x740)

Step 3: Draw flower petals in various shapes and sizes around the outside of the outlined puddles.
Watercolor Flower Doodles with Black Pen
You can stop right there, or you can add additional color with brush markers or your other favorite type of coloring tools.
Step 4: Add additional color and patterns with markers. Use a white paint pen on top to make highlights and embellishments.
Watercolor Flowers with Pen and Marker
I had so much fun, I covered several sheets of paper with watercolor flower doodles.
Watercolor Flower Doodle
Flower Doodles
Detail of flowers
Detail pic of doodles
detail shot
Flower Doodles Close up

Watercolor Doodles of Flowers

Video of the Week #61: The Secret Life of a Street Photographer

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Video of the Week #61: The Secret Life of a Street Photographer

You might want to watch this full-screen, so that you can see the magnificent photographs better.