The Ultimate Summer Day

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I went for a walk the other day a little after noon. I was wearing jeans and a t-shirt, a light hoodie, and sandals. I live in the Phoenix area, and the temperature was in the mid-60s.

(But earlier in the morning, when I took the dog out, in my PJs and terry robe, the temperature was about 40 degrees. I know, I’m spoiled. I suffer when the temp dips down below 50.)

I came home from my walk, took a shower, and dressed in denim bermudas and a long-sleeve shirt.

I don’t like any weather that involves raking or shoveling. Winter is enjoyable here, but I really like summer better, even in the desert; though in the 100+ degree heat, I’d prefer to be in the pool if I have to be outside.

Sea and sky

My ideal summer day is based on the ones I experienced as a 15-year-old growing up in New Jersey. The sky would be blue, the sun warm, the temperature in the mid-to-upper 80s (though with the typical 85% humidity, it would be much less comfortable than Arizona dry heat), and I would be at the beach. I’d have a cooler with me, with cold soda and sandwiches and snacks. I’d have no responsibilities for the day—no job to go to, no meals to prepare, no appointments upcoming, no pressing deadlines to meet. And I’d have a friend with me, preferably one of the opposite sex.

When our kids were little and we still lived in New Jersey, but closer to the Pennsylvania border rather than near the Atlantic shore, we might drive half an hour to a lake to have a change of pace from the backyard pool. But my ideal day still included sun and water.

When we moved to Arizona, we bought another house with a pool, because we knew it would play a big part in our summers. A lot of people don’t like having pools, because they see the upkeep as tedious and expensive. But we had five kids. Going on a one-week vacation during the summer would cost us more than the price of a year’s worth of pool chemicals. And really, if you invest in a good pool vacuum, maintenance only takes maybe an hour or less a week. When the kids were young, we were in the pool every day. The kids’ birthday parties were always pool parties (except for Andy’s—he was born in December).

Now, with our kids all grown, we are not in the pool every day from April through October. Greg’s not been in the pool in years. I average about a dozen dips per summer, though every time I go in, I wonder why I don’t do it every day.

Only six more months till summer.

I can’t wait.

Creative Juice #278

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Creative Juice #278

These articles held my interest this week:

Kammie’s Oddball Challenge: Signage

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No parking
Speed humps

More Oddballs.

Video of the Week #341: Joni Mitchell Honored at Kennedy Center

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Wordless Wednesday/ Flower of the Day: Flower Border with Fallen Leaves

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Flower border with fallen leaves

More FOTD.

Flower of the Day: Narcissus

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Narcissus

More FOTD.

Monday Morning Wisdom #345

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Monday Morning Wisdom #345

Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.

~Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

From the Creator’s Heart #342

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Don’t worry about anything, but in everything, through prayer and petition with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known to God. (Philippians 4:6 HCSB)

I’d Rather Be Dancing Kurdish Folk Dances

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The Kurds are an Iranian ethnic group native to the mountainous region of Kurdistan located in southeastern Turkey, northwestern Iran, northern Iraq, and northern Syria. Their dances (at least the ones I found on YouTube) are characterized by line formation and joined hands (often pinkie holds). Dancers at the end of the lines typically twirl scarves. There is a sameness to the dances, though variations in steps, direction, arm movements, height of foot raises, bounces, shoulder involvement, and music. Sometimes heads turn in unison.

A men’s dance group:

Beautiful Kurdish costumes:

Kurdish dance from Iraq:

Women’s dance group:

Smartphone footage from a Kurdish wedding celebration (I think this is called Yepyeni Hallay):

I remember learning this dance at Phoenix International Folk Dancers: Şemmamê

Aliyo Dino Grani Halay. Being danced in the street in a multi-generational setting, this may be a wedding or a festival:

This dance is called either Tin Tin or Teen when danced to the song Tin Tin Tini Mini Hanem; it’s also known as (Hey) Ghuma Ghuma or (Hey) Khuma Khuma, after the original song it was danced to:

Oee Naze:

Zozan:

Creative Juice #277

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Creative Juice #277

Ideas for a better life and more and better art.