Monthly Archives: August 2016

Wordless Wednesday: Fig?

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Wordless Wednesday: Fig?

Taken in the ‘hood January 2016. Not sure what it is.

Fig

Photograph © by ARHuelsenbeck

Outlining Your Novel Workbook by K.M. Weiland—a Book Review

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Outlining Your Novel Workbook by K.M. Weiland—a Book Review

I love K.M. Weiland’s blog, Helping Writers Become Authors, with its helpful articles on the craft of fiction. I also loved her book, Dreamlander. So it’s reasonable that I would buy her Outlining Your Novel Workbook: Step-by-Step Exercises for Planning Your Best Book, the companion to her manual, Outlining Your Novel: Map Your Way to Success.

I am a person who gets into trouble when I try to write by the seat of my pants. I really need to plan out my story pretty much from beginning to end—not that I won’t follow any brilliant idea that comes to me spontaneously, but just so that my plot doesn’t die from the dreaded lack of destination. Without an outline, my characters just wander around aimlessly until they hit a dead end.

Outlining

In the past, I’ve used The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure for Storytellers and Screenwriters by Christopher Vogler with its archtypes and twelve stages to outline my novels, but it’s only taken me so far.

Since NaNoWriMo of November 2014, I’ve been struggling to get my (hopefully) first publishable novel, The Unicornologist, into shape. It was missing something, but I couldn’t figure out what. I decided to take it through the steps in Weiland’s book after the fact to figure out where the holes in the manuscript were. She suggests exercises that help you brainstorm in specific ways. For example:

Ask yourself every “what if” question that pops to mind regarding your story. Some of your ideas will be ridiculous; most will probably never make it into your book. But don’t censor yourself. By allowing yourself to write down every idea, no matter how crazy, you may come up with story-transforming gems.

Weiland uses illustrations from her own books and others’ to explain what makes plot compelling. She asks questions that make you dig deeper into your characters:

  • What Lie does your character believe that is keeping him from the Thing He Needs while prompting him to believe he must gain the Thing He Wants?

  • How can your protagonist demonstrate determination?

  • How can your protagonist show kindness to others?

I have used questionnaires to build dossiers on my characters, but I don’t really like questionnaires, because so many of the questions seem immaterial to my story. (My main character’s favorite color really doesn’t come into play in my mystical fantasy.) Weiland includes “interview” questions, and many of them don’t help me. However, the questions like the ones quoted above make me think about the characters’ personalities and visualize their actions and help me figure out how to portray them.

Weiland has authors focus on six important aspects of their novels: premise, scenes, character backstories and interviews, setting (including world building, if necessary), story elements, and structure.

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K.M. Weiland

Every writer has to find his own approach to outlining (or else do without, as Stephen King and many other successful storytellers have). Rather than reinvent the wheel, as it were, most of us try out multiple approaches and keep the aspects that work for our projects. Reading through Outlining Your Novel Workbook in tandem with revising my work-in-progress did help me find holes in my story, and add detail and emotional impact to my scenes. I will use many parts of it for outlining my future stories, but I will probably skip over the parts that don’t apply to my story or resonate with me.

What about you? Do you follow a method of outlining when preparing to write your novels? Or are you a pantser (one who writes “by the seat of one’s pants,” or sans outline)? Can you recommend a book on this topic that you’ve found particularly helpful? Please share in the comments below.

Flower of the Day: Roses

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Flower of the Day: Roses

For Cee’s Flower of the Day challenge–these voluptuous roses I saw yesterday.

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©ARHuelsenbeck

R.I.P., Gene Wilder

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R.I.P., Gene Wilder

Gene Wilder (Blazing Saddles, Young Frankenstein) passed away this morning.

Found on BrainyQuote:

I like writing books. I’d rather be at home with my wife. I can write, take a break, come out, have a glass of tea, give my wife a kiss, and go back in and write some more. It’s not so bad. I am really lucky. ~Gene Wilder

Photo of Gene Wilder by Caroline Bonarde Ucci

Monday Morning Wisdom #65

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Monday Morning Wisdom #65

Found on TwitterGolub

From the Creator’s Heart #61

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From the Creator’s Heart #61

Come, let us sing for joy to the Lord; let us shout aloud to the Rock of our salvation. Let us come before him with thanksgiving and extol him with music and song (Psalm 95: 1-2 NIV).

A Snippet of The Unicornologist, Chapter 13

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A Snippet of The Unicornologist, Chapter 13

It’s time for Weekend Writing Warriors! Every Sunday, a bunch of writers post 8-10-sentence snippets from their works-in-progress on their blogs. There’s a lot of reading, commenting and great writing. Click on the link to see the full list.

Hillary found some of her mother’s needlepoints in a box in the basement. Missing her deceased mother, and wanting to connect to her somehow, she decides to create a needlepoint picture of a unicorn.

Hillary compared the instructions in her library book to the sample of her mother’s work. The stitches crossed over intersections of the horizontal and vertical threads of the canvas, tilting from lower left to upper right. On the backside they were mostly straight. Knots were forbidden; tails of yarn had to be anchored under stitches on the backside.

She marked the center point on her graph, then basted a thread down the middle of her canvas vertically and horizontally. The threads met at the center of the canvas, and that corresponded to the center of the graph. Surprising Hillary, the book recommended starting the design in the center and working out to the edges. This seemed counterintuitive—wasn’t it logical to start in the upper left corner? Oh, well; she would follow the wisdom of generations’ worth of experience.

In the beginning, progress was slow–several hours’ work yielded only a few lines of pattern.

I know it’s short (the limit is ten sentences), but what do you think of this small excerpt from Chapter 13? I’m hoping it will resonate with anyone who’s done needlepoint or counted cross stitch. Any suggestions on how I can make it better? Please leave your comments below.