Monthly Archives: February 2017

Cowboys and Indians

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Cowboys and Indians

Residents of Arizona are familiar with the Basha grocery empire. But not all are aware of the Basha family’s cultural legacy.

At Basha corporate headquarters in Chandler, Arizona, resides a phenomenal museum of Western American art, the Selma Basha Salmeri Gallery, named after the aunt who inspired Eddie Basha’s lifelong love affair with art.

A small sampling of the extensive collection of over 3500 items:

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El Encuentro by Paul Pletka

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by Harrison Begay

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Bowl, carved from wood and polished

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Many panels of drawings of kachinas by Cecil Calnimptewa

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A whole cabinet of fetishes, small animal carvings representing the spirits of the animals, and believed to have special powers.

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by Bruce Green

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Cowboy lighting his cigarette with a branding iron

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Breaking Wild Horses by John Clymer

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Devil’s Gate by John Clymer

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The White Buffalo by John Clymer

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The Peace Pipe by John Clymer

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To get the full effect of this beautiful, detailed sculpture, it’s necessary to walk around it and view it from several angles.

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Is it just me, or does the kachina on the left below resemble Rodin’s The Thinker?

And does the kachina on the left below resemble Rodin’s The Kiss?

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I’ve enjoyed the Native American art at The Heard Museum in Phoenix, but I have a new appreciation for the cowboy artists as a result of seeing their work up close. If you’re ever in the area, make a point to stop and see the Eddie Basha Collection.

Creative Juice #30

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Creative Juice #30

A baker’s dozen of artful articles (better for you than donuts!):

In the Meme Time: Processing Critiques

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processing-critiques

Guest Post: Private Lives

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Guest Post: Private Lives

Many thanks to Donna for this guest post, which first appeared on her blog (one of my favorites!), My OBT.

My OBT

View original post 174 more words

Video of the Week #87: Painstaking

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Video of the Week #87: Painstaking

Looking Down

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Looking Down

For Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge:

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Once upon a time, this circle of concrete secured our mailbox.

Until my husband took it out.Fun Foto

Unintentionally.

While backing down the driveway in his car.

Wordless Wednesday: Hotmail

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Wordless Wednesday: Hotmail

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Photo by ARHuelsenbeck

Color Your World – Green

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Color Your World – Green

For the Color Your World photo challenge: img_0097

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TUESDAYS OF TEXTURE | WEEK 8 OF 2017

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TUESDAYS OF TEXTURE | WEEK 8 OF 2017

For De Monte y Mar’s texture challenge:img_0031

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Photographs by ARHuelsenbeck

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Good Sources for Free Images for Your Blog

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Good Sources for Free Images for Your Blog

The right illustrations can make your blog more attractive and inviting. Readers are more likely to stay awhile if they’re not faced with unbroken print.

If you have a digital camera or a smart phone, you can take your own pictures. You are your best source of free images, because (unless you’re taking a photograph of a person without their permission, or of something that discloses proprietary information) you aren’t infringing on someone else’s rights.

But sometimes you just can’t snap the picture you need. Maybe, for a particular post, you need a tropical scene, or an aerial view. Maybe you need snowy mountains, but you live in the desert. Lots of photo services will sell you what you need, but if, like me, you blog for love, not money, you need to keep your expenses low. (Like, $0.00.)

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Found on StockSnap.

Here are the best sources I’ve found for free images (totally free to use, no attribution necessary):

  • Unsplash. High-quality, high-resolution photographs. You can sign up to periodically receive pictures in your email. Unsplash also has a search feature.
  • Death to Stock. I subscribe to their free email service, and download all the freebies I think I may actually use. To have access to their entire library (1500+ and growing), you have to sign up for their premium plan, $180 per year.
  • StockSnap. If I’m looking for a particular subject, I often look through this searchable database first.
  • Pixabay. Sometimes you envision a tall, skinny picture to border a list. Pixabay has an orientation filter on their search engine that will select vertical shots for you, and leave out the horizontal ones (or vice versa).
  • Ivorymix. These are fashionable, stylized shots. You can sign up to get a free packet every month by email. I find their site difficult to search. Here’s their infomercial:
  • FancyCrave. I just discovered this site. I signed up to receive 14 free photos each week by email.

If you can’t find what you need among those sources, try these:

  • Wikipedia. Search for the subject you want a photo of, like Winston Churchill, unicorns, etc. Virtually all the photographs on Wikipedia are either in the public domain, or usable under a Creative Commons license. Click on the image you like, and click on the More details Scroll down, and you can read whether the picture is public domain, if you’re allowed to alter it in any way, or if you need to attribute the photographer or artist, and any other requirements.
  • Bing. When you hunt for images on Bing, I strongly recommend you click the Filter button, and under the License option, choose either Public domain or All Creative Commons. Even so, the picture might be still copyrighted, so only use it if you are sure you’re not infringing on someone’s possible rights.
Man holding camera DeathtoStock

From Death to Stock.

What do you do for illustrations for your blog? Do you like a source not listed here? Please share in the comments below.