Monthly Archives: October 2016

Guest Post: Lucky Thirteen

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Guest Post: Lucky Thirteen

In case you don’t have enough little monsters coming to your house today, here is a guest post from Donna at MyOBT.

My OBT

fonz Matthew Roby

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Monday Morning Wisdom #74

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Monday Morning Wisdom #74

MMWThe idea is to write it so people hear it and it slides through the brain and goes straight to the heart. –Maya Angelou

Photo of Maya Angelou by York College ISLGP.

From the Creator’s Heart #70

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From the Creator’s Heart #70

But all who are left will shout and sing for joy; those in the west will praise the majesty of God, and those in the east will respond with praise. Hear them singing to the Lord from the ends of the earth, singing glory to the Righteous One! But my heart is heavy with grief, for evil still prevails and treachery is everywhere (Isaiah 24: 14-16 TLB).

Snippet #26 from The Unicornologist

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Snippet #26 from The Unicornologist

Every Sunday, the Weekend Writing Warriors share 8-10-sentence snippets from their works-in-progress on their blogs for others to read and comment on. Join the fun! Click on the link to see the full list.

This snippet begins immediately after last week’s. Hillary and Robin have hiked into the woods to see the unicorn (Bob), and they hear a commotion. They investigate and confront two people who are trying to capture Bob.

A man had one arm around Bob’s neck and held onto his horn with the other. A woman struggled to put a bridle’s bit in the unicorn’s mouth.

Hillary ran directly into the fray. “You’re hurting him!” she shouted as she pushed the woman out of the way. Then she pummeled the man with her fists. Bob twisted himself out of the man’s grasp and galloped away.

The man squared off against Hillary. “What’s the matter with you? We almost had it.”

Stepping between them, Robin challenged, “Back off, mister.”

I know it’s short (the limit is ten sentences), but what do you think of this small excerpt from Chapter 15? Any suggestions on how I can make it better? Please comment below.

Out of the Mouths of Gargoyles

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Out of the Mouths of Gargoyles

A gargoyle is an architectural feature in the form of a carved grotesque creature with a spout designed to convey water from a roof and away from the side of a building, thereby preventing rainwater from running down masonry walls and thereby eroding the mortar between. The length of the gargoyle determines how far water is thrown from the wall.

Please click on the pictures below for credits and captions.

Gottesblog describes the origin of gargoyles:

The word “Gargoyle” shares a common root with the word “gargle,” which comes from the French gargouille, “throat.” A true gargoyle is a waterspout. The word is also derived from the Latin “gurgulio” and is therefore onomatopoetic, meaning “throat” and sounding like the water which gurgles as it passes through the throat. A gargoyle makes a gurgling sound as water passes through the waterspout.

Legend has it that a fierce dragon named La Gargouille with a long neck and membranous wings lived in a cave near the river Seine. The dragon caused much fear and destruction with its fiery breath, spouting water and devouring ships and men. Each year, the residents of Rouen would placate Gargouille with an offering of a victim, usually a criminal, though it was said the dragon preferred maidens. Around 600, the village was saved by St. Romanus, who promised to deal with the dragon if the townspeople agreed to be baptized and to build a church. Romanus, armed with only a crucifix, subdued the dragon by making the sign of the cross, and then led the now docile beast back to town on a leash made from his priest’s robe. La Gargouille was then burned at the stake, it is said that his head and neck were so well tempered by the heat of his fiery breath, that they would not burn. These remnants were then mounted on the town wall and became the model for gargoyles for centuries to come.

The photographs in the section below are courtesy of Creativity 103.

Although thought of as a gothic invention, gargoyle-like lion heads are found on ancient Egyptian, Greek, Etruscan, and Roman structures. To be sure, gargoyles flourished on medieval era cathedrals, most famously on Notre Dame in Paris.

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Notre Dame de Paris

gargoylesnotredame-by-ceinturion

Photo by Centurion

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Photo by Krzysztof Mizera

Want to learn more about gargoyles? Click on the links below:

Creative Juice #13

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Creative Juice #13

Fifteen articles to stimulate your muse.

In the Meme Time: Don’t Wait

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In the Meme Time: Don’t Wait

pencil-writing-meme