Author Archives: Andrea R Huelsenbeck

About Andrea R Huelsenbeck

Andrea R Huelsenbeck is a wife, a mother of five and a former elementary general music teacher. A freelance writer in the 1990s, her nonfiction articles and book reviews appeared in Raising Arizona Kids, Christian Library Journal, and other publications. She is currently working on a young adult mystical fantasy novel and a mystery.

Wordless Wednesday: Mother’s Day Azaleas

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Wordless Wednesday: Mother’s Day Azaleas

Doing double duty for Cee’s Flower of the Day Challenge.  My Mother’s Day gift from my son, Andy.

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The Irish Cultural Center, Phoenix, Arizona

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The Irish Cultural Center, Phoenix, Arizona

Right in the center of bustling, modern Phoenix rises a complex of stone structures reminiscent of medieval times.

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Pass through the gates and you realize you’re somewhere magical.

The Irish Cultural Center is many things: a monument to a people devastated by famine; a place where Irish-Americans can research their roots; an academy where you can learn to play harp or bodhran, speak Gaelic, or dance Irish and Scottish dances; home to a rare facsimile of the Book of Kells; a library housing collections of Irish literature and history. It is also where the Phoenix International Folk Dancers meet every Tuesday night, in the building pictured below.

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By far the largest building is the McClelland Library.

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The Visitor’s Center looks like a quaint Irish cottage. It also contains a gift shop.

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Though the buildings look hundreds of years old, they were constructed after 2000.

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And here is a monument commemorating  the deaths of 1,500,000 people during the Great Hunger of 1845-1850:IMG_0605IMG_0607IMG_0606

For more information about the Irish Cultural Center, see their website.

Monday Morning Wisdom #103

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Monday Morning Wisdom #103

“I did stand-up comedy for 18 years. Ten of those years were spent learning, four years were spent refining, and four years were spent in wild success. I was seeking comic originality, and fame fell on me as a byproduct. The course was more plodding than heroic.”~Steve MartinMMW

Photo of Steve Martin by Joella Marano.

From the Creator’s Heart #99

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From the Creator’s Heart #99

Rejoice with those who rejoice; mourn with those who mourn. Live in harmony with one another. Do not be proud, but be willing to associate with people of low position. Do not be conceited (Romans 12: 15-16 NIV).

Weekend Writing Warriors: Snippet #55

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Weekend Writing Warriors: Snippet #55

Every Sunday, the Weekend Writing Warriors and Snippet Sunday share 8-10-sentence snippets from their works-in-progress on their blogs for others to read and comment on. Join the fun! Click on the links to see the full lists.

This will be my last snippet from The Unicornologist. I’m nearly done with the next-to-last edit. I have no idea what I’ll excerpt next week.

The Unicornologist ~ High school freshman Hillary Noone, on a field trip to The Cloisters, receives a prophecy: she is destined to save the unicorn. Though she shrugs it off as being preposterous, soon life imitates art, and she finds herself in mortal danger.

The day after the conversation in my last snippet, Hillary (who’s been camping in the forest to protect Bob, the unicorn) hears a commotion and finds Dave struggling with the unicorn. She screams for him to stop.

Turning back toward the unicorn, the man thrust out one hand; Bob shifted away from a metallic flash.

He has a knife! “No!” Hillary squeezed between the man and Bob, throwing out her arms to protect the unicorn.

“Get out of my way,” growled the man, brandishing the knife.

Hillary felt her underpants dampen. He’s going to kill me–I should run. Then cold resolve took over, and she stood her ground.

The man pulled his knife hand back, ready to attack. In the next instant, Bob suddenly pushed in front of Hillary, and an explosion went off.

Yeah, I know–I’m a horrible person to cut off there. It’s that pesky 10-sentence maximum. What do you think of this small excerpt from Chapter 25? Any suggestions on how I can make it better? Please comment below.

Monochrome

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Monochrome

My offerings for Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge in response to the prompt All One Color:

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Photographs © by ARHuelsenbeck.

 

Meet and Greet

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Meet and Greet

Welcome! I’m borrowing this blog sharing idea, which I’ve seen on several different sites. I’m especially interested in seeing new blogs devoted to the arts and the creative process, but everyone is invited to participate.

Meet and Greet

Here are the rules:

  1. Leave a link to your blog or or to a post and tell a little about yourself in the comments section below
  2. Read a bunch of the links other participants shared. Comment on them, and share them.
  3. Share this post on social media.  Non-blogger friends will love you for posting Meet and Greet on Facebook and Twitter because they find new blogs to follow.
  4. Keep the love going. Reblog this post, edit it to suit you, and add tags.

Creative Juice #42

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Creative Juice #42

Twelve recent articles to challenge your preconceptions and open you up to new possibilities.

In the Meme Time: When You Feel Like a Failure

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In the Meme Time: When You Feel Like a Failure

When you feel like a failure

Guest Post: Writing a Memoir of Restoration, Renewal, and Rediscovery by Marilyn L. Davis

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Guest Post: Writing a Memoir of Restoration, Renewal, and Rediscovery by Marilyn L. Davis

Thanks to Two Drops of Ink: A Literary Blog and to Marilyn L. Davis for this insightful article.

Two Drops of Ink: A Literary Blog

By: Marilyn L. Davis

“It has always been on the written page that the world has come into focus for me. If I can piece all these bits of memory together with the diaries and letters and the scribbled thoughts that clutter my mind and bookshelves, then maybe I can explain what happened. Maybe the worlds I have inhabited for the past seven years will assume order and logic and wholeness on paper. Maybe I can tell my story in a way that is useful to someone else.” ― Nancy Horan, Loving Frank

While Nancy Horan’s book is a novel, this passage helps explain the power of memoir or reflective writing. I’m a huge fan of the genre, in part, because it began my recovery from substance abuse, but more importantly, this type of reflective writing healed me in ways I could not imagine when I first started writing.

Much…

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